Tesla’s Elon Musk in talks with Google over self driving vehicle tech, says sensor system still too expensive

Sergey-Brin-Pink-Model-S-Tesla

(Googlers turned Sergey Brin’s Tesla Model S into a pink Batmobile for April Fool’s Day)

According to a report from Bloomberg, Tesla’s Elon Musk has discussed with Google the possibility of adding self driving vehicle technology to its fleet of all-electric cars. The problem, says Musk, is that Google’s approach to the technology is currently too expensive compared to camera-based systems:

“The problem with Google’s current approach is that the sensor system is too expensive,” Musk said. “It’s better to have an optical system, basically cameras with software that is able to figure out what’s going on just by looking at things… “We’ve had some technical discussions with Google” about its Light Detection and Ranging, or Lidar, laser tracking system, Musk said last week, noting that it’s an expensive approach that may not prove feasible, Musk said.

While it’s possible Google could contribute to bringing the driverless features to future Tesla vehicles, Musk told Bloomberg it’s more likely the company will develop its own “autopilot system”. That’s something that other automakers are already doing with Toyota, Lexus, and Audi all showing off self-driving car technology at CES back in January: Read more

Talking Schmidt: I propose that at the age of 18, you should change your name [Video]

via edudemic.com

via edudemic.com

Wow, that didn’t take long. Last week we debuted our new series Talking Schmidt where we take a moment to celebrate some of the Google chairman’s more colorful statements, and today Schmidt already delivered the next round of material.

Eric Schmidt spoke today (as he has been doing an awful lot lately) at New York University’s Stern school of business where he jokingly suggested that young people should change their name at the age of 18 as a general policy to address growing privacy concerns that Internet services present.

We can probably expect more of these unforgettable lines as Eric Schmidt promotes his new book The New Digital Age with his coauthor Jared Cohen.

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Days after getting Google Play, Barnes & Noble Nook HD and HD+ receive heavy price cuts for the holiday week

AT8155_COMBO_billboard_V1_b

From 9to5toys.com (Twitter, Feed, Facebook):

Just days after Barnes & Noble reversed course and began allowing NOOK owners access to over 700,000 apps and games (and books?) from the Google Play Store, both the HD and HD+ versions have received heavy price cuts.  For the next week, you can pickup a NOOK HD tablet starting at just $150 (25% savings) and a NOOK HD + for $179 (34% savings).  These savings are also available online and in-store from Best Buy.  As of right now Barnes & Noble are saying these price cuts are temporary but we’re getting the feeling that they could become the new norm.

There is a good chance these price drops are in response to the Kindle Fire HD sale Amazon launched over the weekend.

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Saturday Night Live hits Google Glass

If you wonder what normals are thinking, the above is probably a good guess. Google would be well served to make a few more of those feel good movies to counter the rising sentiment against the product. Read more

Google Glass: the case for the prosecution & the defense (Video)

When you stage a debate on Google Glass between a self-described technology evangelist and a man who believes that current technology trends are debasing culture, things are likely to get interesting … especially when the discussion begins with the question of the etiquette of wearing the gadget at a urinal.

Check out The Next Web‘s conference video below of a conversation between Glass enthusiast Robert “I will never live a day of my life from now on without it” Scoble and British entrepreneur and privacy advocate Andrew Keen …

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UK govt to quiz Google on whether it was ‘economical with the truth’ on tax

The British government, which previously questioned Google’s tax arrangements in the country, is to call the company back in to determine whether it has been “economical with the truth” in its previous responses, reports Reuters.

Last November, Google claimed that the reason it paid just £6m tax in the UK on a turnover of £395m was that all its Adword sales to UK customers were handled by staff based in Ireland, Google spokesman Matt Brittin openly admitting that this was to reduce tax payments. A Reuters investigation now casts doubt on this claim … Read more