HP unveils 14-inch Pavilion Chromebook, now available for $329

HP Pavilion 14-c01us Chromebook

We posted a leaked spec sheet late last month that showed off what appeared to be an upcoming 14-inch Chromebook from HP. HP has officially announced the new Chromebook today. While it might have a 14-inch display two inches wider than any other Chromebook, it also happens to be more expensive than Samsung’s latest offering at $329. That’s significantly more than Samsung’s latest $249 model.

HP offered up full specs on the device that is available to order through the company’s website now. Not only is the HP Pavilion 14-c01us Chromebook more expensive, it’s also heavier than Samsung’s offering at 4lbs compared to 2.5lbs. Battery life is unfortunately the same story with an approximate 4.25 hours quoted compared to the 6.5 hours Samsung’s Chromebook offers. If you can get past that, the new HP device packs in a 14-inch diagonal HD BrightView LED-backlit (1,366-by-768-pixel), 1.1GHz Intel Celeron 847 processor, 2GB of RAM, 16GB SATA SSD, HDMI, USB 2.0, as well as an Ethernet port.

The Samsung Chromebook has been the top-selling laptop on Amazon since it launched; Acer reported that Chromebooks make up 5-10% of US shipments; and in the first two months of 2013 Google announced two new devices from two new partners, Lenovo and HP. In the Enterprise, Google just announced 2,000 schools have deployed Chromebooks and businesses like Kaplan, Dillard’s and Quality Distribution are using Chrome devices as well.

HP’s hoping consumers will opt for the larger display, keyboard, and additional ports for the extra $80, but we’re not too excited about the battery life.

Vint Cerf would fertilize his tomatoes with the WSJ’s ‘myth’ that gov didn’t create the internet

Following an article on The Wall Street Journal from columnist Gordon Crovitz, titled “Who Really Invented the Internet?“, Vint Cerf, “father of the internet” and Google’s chief internet evangelist, is weighing in on Crovtz’ assertion that the government’s hand in creating the Internet is an “urban legend.” In an email interview with CNET, the man behind the evolution of TCP/IP networking protocols disagreed with Crovitz and talked about his involvement in the development of the Web:

In his Wall Street Journal column, Gordon Crovitz writes that the federal government’s involvement in the creation of the Internet was modest. Does that jibe with your recollection?

Vint Cerf: No. The United States government via ARPA started the project. (Bob Kahn initiated the Internetting project when he joined ARPA in late 1972. He had been principal architect of the ARPANET IMP (packet switch) while at BBN.

Read more

Sony GoogleTV/BluRay for $180 + Free shipping

From 9to5toys.com:

PC Connection Express offers the Sony Internet TV Blu-ray Disc Player with Google TV, model no. NSZ-GT1, for $199.99. Coupon code “Deal10Blu” cuts it to $179.99. With free shipping, that’s $20 under our mention from two weeks ago and the lowest total price we could find by $9, although most merchants charge $200 or more. It features support for the Android-based Google TV service, 1080p upscaling, 8GB of built-in storage, 802.11n wireless and Ethernet connectivity, four USB ports, HDMI output, and more. This device is currently being updated to the new GoogleTV 2.0 with Apps and more.

Read more

From China, 10.1-inch Android tablet with Ethernet port and $160 pricetag

Looking for an entry-level 720p 10-inch Android tablet? What about one with a built-in Ethernet port? We just discovered this mystery device going for $160 on eBay and sporting a 1GHz ARM 11 Cortex A9 processor, 4GB internal storage, 3-megapixel camera, 512MB RAM, a “10.1 inch TFT Super slim 16:9 Touchscreen”, and built-in WiFi and ethernet port. It also bears a striking resemblance to the industry’s leader.

Nobody seems to know much about the “MID M1006S Android 10.1 Tablet PC”. A quick Google search revealed Shenzhen, China-based manufacturer HongKong Haokey Tech Co LTD appears to be behind the tablet. They currently have an Alibaba listing (20 units or more) which is more than likely the source for those reselling the device online.

Don’t expect a comparable experience to current gen leaders in the Android tablet market, however. Early reviews from CNET forum posters prove the resistive touch screen limits the experience, to say the least. Forum poster “R. Proffitt” notes, “No pinch or two finger zoom. So much does not work on resistive pads”.

Gallery below:
Read more