Chrome/OS Overview Updated December 31, 2017

Chrome/OS

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May 2011 - December 2017


Available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, Google Chrome is the most widely used desktop browser in the world. Since its launch in 2008, Chrome has expanded to Android, iOS, and is the basis of a cloud-based operating system.

Recommended Chromebooks:

History

Chrome was developed out of frustration at the state of browsers that limited Google’s increasingly complex web apps. In creating its own browser, Google could push the state of the web and build the best experience for its products.

Launched in September for Microsoft Windows, Chrome quickly gained 1% of the total desktop market share by the end of the year. A developer preview in 2009 brought Chrome to Mac OS X and Linux, but a stable version was not available until May 2010. In November 2011, Chrome overtook Firefox in worldwide usage and in September 2012 became the most widely used web browser beating Internet Explorer.

In July 2009, Google announced a project to build an operating system that stored applications and user data in the cloud. The thin client OS was publicly demoed in November, but it was not until 2011 that the first Chromebooks shipped from OEM partners.

A beta version of Google Chrome for Android launched in February 2012, with a stable version ready by June. Google also released an iOS version, but it is limited technically due to security restrictions enforced by Apple.

Features |

Chrome shares many of the same features and underlying technology across all platforms. The browser and OS maintain version number parity across all platforms. Every six weeks a major version is released to the Stable Channel and a new developer version is introduced in the Canary Channel. A Beta Channel acts as an intermediary way to access new features without too many bugs.

Security

The automatic Chrome update system downloads updates in the background and insures that users are always on the latest version of Chrome. There are many minor patches between between major updates that delivers security fixes and keeps users secure. Chrome maintains a Safe Browsing blacklist of malicious sites that pop up a bright red warning so users can turn back.

Tabs are sandboxed to make sure processes cannot interacting with critical memory functions and other processes. Besides for security, a multi-process architecture gives each site and plug-in a separate process. As such, a crash will only take down that tab and not the entire application.

Since the first version, Chrome has had a private browsing feature. Incognito mode prevents the browser from storing cookies or history and can be opened alongside regular tabs.

Interface

The main Chrome interface has remained mostly the same over the years. In fact, the ‘Chrome’ name refers to the lack of UI elements and a focus on the browsing experience. An Omnibox acts as both the URL bar and search box. At the time, many browsers had two separate fields right next to each other. The Omnibox has prediction capabilities to help users find what they are looking for and is also present on the mobile apps.

Android apps

Later this year, Android apps and the Play Store will arrive on Chrome OS. Google previously experimented using ARC Welder to virtualize the Android run time and allowed apps to run on all platforms, including Mac, Windows, and Linux. The latest approach is limited to Chrome OS, but provides a much more native and fast experience. Apps open up as windows and can become phone or tablet-sized. Touchscreen Chromebooks will provide the best experience.

Chrome/OS Stories December 31, 2017

How to stream the New Year’s Eve Ball Drop in Times Square on Chromecast, Android, Chrome OS, and Android TV

This is it, everybody. Today is the last day of 2017! For many who stay home when the clock hits midnight, it’s a tradition to watch the ball drop in Times Square in New York City on television. In case you aren’t in front of your TV or don’t have a cable/satellite subscription, here are a couple of ways to stream the festivities on your Android handset, Chrome browser, or Android TV…

Chrome/OS Stories December 28, 2017

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Chrome/OS Stories December 21, 2017

Earlier this month, Qualcomm unveiled its next-generation processor for the upcoming wave of flagship smartphones, while also showcasing how Snapdragon can power all-day cellular-connected Windows laptops. A new report today suggests that Chromebooks could one day be powered by the Snapdragon 845 processor.

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Chrome/OS Stories December 19, 2017

If you’re anything like me, you have noticed that the holidays are now upon us and you haven’t bought gifts for everyone just yet. Thankfully, there is still time to pick up or order some last minute gifts. Here are a couple of items that are still in stock and can be at your door in time for the big day…

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