Chrome 62 is now rolling out to desktops in the stable channel with a number of new features for developers, as well as some changed security behaviors as Google continues to encourage HTTPS adoption.

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The first “Not secure” badge to the right of the URL in the address bar appeared this January on HTTP sites where password or credit card fields were present. Google is now extending the warning to any HTTP site where user data is entered. The badge will only appear after users begin entering information into a site.

Meanwhile, every HTTP site in Incognito will sport the “Not secure” warning as Google notes the increased expectation of privacy that users have in this mode. The end goal is for all non-HTTPS sites to eventually feature this badge.

On macOS, various buttons will now match the native style of the operating system with a new background color, border radius, and padding.

With support for OpenType Variable Fonts, typography gains responsive design. At the moment, a font file contains a single instance of a font family, with one weight (Regular, Bold, Black) or one stretch (Normal, Condensed, Expanded). Variable fonts allow for type to easily change its stretch, style, and weight through a single compact font file.

The Network Information API in version 62 now returns actual stats about a user’s connectivity rather than just speed estimates based on the type of connection. Available metrics include current expected round trip time, throughput, and notifications of performance changes. One use for this API is to optimize for network constraints, like detecting a user’s slower connection and automatically serving a simplified site.

Along with Android, desktop Chrome adds a new Ambient Light Sensor API that allows sites to adapt to changes in light intensity.

Chrome 62 for desktop is now available, with updates for Android and Chrome OS coming soon.


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