As much as the technology on our phones has changed over the years, the importance of 911 hasn’t. However, with the new tech, the service has only gotten better, but it still has some problems with smartphones. Specifically, with locations being sent to emergency services by carriers. Now, Google is working on a system that makes this process a bit easier…

The best gifts for Android users

A report by the Wall Street Journal (via Engadget) claims that Google tested a system across a few States during December and January. Apparently, Google’s test took the location from Android phones calling 911 rather than requiring 911 services to get that same information from carriers to provide a more precise location.

The test included over 50 call centers in Texas, Tennessee, and Florida. According to the report, tests showed that Google’s location data was not only provided more quickly than what emergency services could obtain from carriers, but it also was more accurate. Where carriers could give a location accurate to about 522 feet, Google was able to narrow that down to around 121 feet.

Presumably, this tech would only work on Android smartphones, unless a deal can be worked out with Apple for a similar setup. As revealed last year, Google’s own Phone app can pull location data for this exact purpose.

Google says it hopes to implement this technology across the US later this year, and will apparently be discussing alongside RapidSOS and West Corp, both of which were also involved with the trial, at an industry conference later this week.

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