UPDATE: OUYA met its $950,000 goal. The project is now at $1,252,480…and it still has 29 days left to go.

OUYA, an Android-powered gaming console for the television, just posted its hefty funding goal on Kickstarter, and it already raised over $500,000 in 13 hours.

The Los Angeles, Calif.-based folks behind OUYA had one main premise in mind when undertaking this revolutionary project: “Let’s make the games less expensive to make, and less expensive to buy.”

OUYA’s controller, console, and interface will come in one package that doubles as a dev kit. There is no need for developers to buy a license or SDK, and they already familiar with the platform, so gaming production should be a breeze. Developers will even have access to OUYA’s open design, so they can make plenty of games that take full advantage of the television. OUYA only requested that developers make some of the gameplay free either through a demo with a full-game upgrade, in-game items or powers, or subscriptions.

OUYA noted it could even change AAA game development: “Forget about licensing fees, retail fees, and publishing fees.”

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The entire system is Hacker friendly, too.

“It’s easy to root (and rooting won’t void your warranty). Everything opens with standard screws. Hardware hackers can create their own peripherals, and connect via USB or Bluetooth,” OUYA explained.

The console’s specifications include: a Tegra3 quad-core processor, 1GB RAM, 8GB of internal flash storage, HDMI connection with support for up to 1080p HD, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth LE 4.0, USB 2.0, Android 4.0, and a controller. Award-winning designer Yves Beha and his firm fuseproject, which sculpted the popular Jambox, designed OUYA’s controller. It features buttons, triggers, laser-precise analog sticks, a D-Pad, and a touchpad for games that cross form factors.

OUYA’s project on Kickstarter needs at least $950,000 by Aug. 9 at 1 a.m. EST to meet its goal. The funds will help OUYA to convert its prototype to production-ready models, deliver developer kits, place first production orders, and fund initial game development. Those who pledge $10 or more can reserve a username, while those with $95 get the console and controller. The deals only get sweeter as the pledges go up.

Check it out: OUYA: A New Kind of Video Game Console

There is just one question left—why is this tech not a part of Google TV?

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