In 2014, Google led a $542 million investment in Magic Leap. Even though the augmented reality startup is now valued at $4.5 billion, there are still no concrete details about its technology. A patent filing (via QZ) today, however, might just provide the first glimpse into what Magic Leap’s headset actually looks like.

The design patent — awarded today — shows a headset with a large visor that covers the front half of a person’s head and their eyes. It does not provide any more specific details, like materials, though we can assume that the visor is made of glass and therefore transparent, like the Microsoft HoloLens headset.

The expansive visor quite cleverly houses several components related to projection, while providing a seamless and clean design. There appears to be eye holes for which to view the world through. This is possibly where the photonic lightfield chip, mentioned in a Wired profile last April, resides.

A band connects the front visor to a curved shaped head rest that looks rather large and presumably houses other electronics and the battery. The rear of the back piece also has some sort of circular opening, possibly for ventilation. There are also side straps that keeps the headset from sliding off.

In the past, Magic Leap has published several videos showing off what its technology can do. Besides immersive real world gaming, the company has shown off several work and productivity related uses, like viewing holographic charts and 3D presentations. Other “apps” are for shopping and viewing immersive video.

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