The latest update to the Peloton app confirms that a rower is on the way and offers hints of what sorts of rides you’ll be able to take and what metrics will be saved.

About APK Insight: In this “APK Insight” post, we’ve decompiled the latest version of an application that have been uploaded to the Play Store. When we decompile these files (called APKs, in the case of Android apps), we’re able to see various lines of code within that hint at possible future features. Keep in mind that the company responsible may or may not ever ship these features, and our interpretation of what they are may be imperfect. We’ll try to enable those that are closer to being finished, however, to show you how they’ll look in the case that they do ship. With that in mind, read on.

Peloton rower

For years now, there have been rumors of Peloton launching a rowing machine, with the most recent confirmation coming from a job listing last month.

The Peloton app for Android has been updated recently to version 1.0.331270, and in it, we find the company has been hard at work preparing their app for the upcoming rower. For example, some in-app text to explain the four positions of a stroke — though seemingly still a work-in-progress — effectively confirms the existence of “the rower.”

This is the starting position of your stroke. Sit tall on the rower with your arms straight and your back upright. Your knees should be just above just above the ankles.

This is the drive position of your stroke. Sit tall on the rower with your arms straight and your back upright. Your knees should be just above just above the ankles.

This is the final position of your stroke. Sit tall on the rower with your arms straight and your back upright. Your knees should be just above just above the ankles.

This is the recover position of your stroke. Sit tall on the rower with your arms straight and your back upright. Your knees should be just above just above the ankles.

Interestingly, in recent updates, Peloton has added a number of texts that look like gibberish at first glance. Take these, for example:

Znmh gb vafcvevat fpravp ebhgrf sebz nebhaq gur tybor.

Pnrfne gb vafcvevat fpravp ebhgrf sebz nebhaq gur tybor.

On a hunch, we ran these texts through a Caesar cipher, and managed to get the texts’ actual contents. Between this, and some additional digging, we find that Peloton is working on their rower under two codenames, “Mazu” (a Chinese sea goddess) and “Caesar.”

Mazu to inspiring scenic routes from around the globe.

Caesar to inspiring scenic routes from around the globe.

Between these two texts, it seems clear that Peloton is preparing an equivalent of the “scenic rides” bicycle feature for their rower. While we couldn’t find any specific details of the routes, it seems likely that these will showcase scenic rivers and waterways from around the world. Otherwise, just like the Peloton Bike, you’ll have an option to “Just Ride,” letting you set the pace.

Just Mazu

Just Caesar

Work out at your own pace and record your metrics.

Digging a bit deeper, we find that the Peloton rower and app will, as you’d expect, measure some stats of your rowing sessions. So far, there are signs of it counting your total strokes, as well as measuring your max stroke rate and average stroke rate.

Thanks to JEB Decompiler, from which some APK Insight teardowns benefit.

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