An interesting project has emerged this week that uses Google Maps to plot historic data from the New York Public Library’s digital collection of photographs taken by Percy Loomis Sperr between 1931 and 1942 and various other photographers between 1870 and 1970. The photos all depict New York City’s various streets and buildings and the OldNYC project aims to integrate those images into Google Maps (via LaughingSquid).

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The OldNYC Project overlays clickable red dots onto a Google Maps interface for viewing detailed information about the specific location. The information includes items such as the exact location, the builds, and floor plans. The brains behind the project explain that they wanted to create an easy to navigate way for people to learn more about the history of New York City.

This site provides an alternative way of browsing the NYPL’s incredible Photographic Views of New York City, 1870s-1970s collection. Its goal is to help you discover the history behind the places you see every day. The images all come from the New York Public Library’s Milstein Collection. While many photographers contributed to the collection, the majority of its images are the work of Percy Loomis Sperr, who documented changes to the city from the late 1920s to the early 1940s.

It’s a pretty cool idea that will undoubtedly be popular among New York City residents, especially those who are interested in learning more about the history of the city. You can view the OldNYC Project by heading to its website. You can navigate around the city just like you would any other Google Maps interface and click the red dots to learn more about each specific location.

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