With Fuchsia, Google is creating an operating system designed to run on everything from Internet-of-Things devices to desktops. In the works since 2016, the latest development sees Google adding support for the Pixelbook as a “target device.”

One aspect that makes Fuchsia unique is how it’s not based on Linux. Rather, its “Zircon” kernel is meant to scale to a wide range of form factors, like laptops and phones, in what could possibly lead to a unified operating system for Google.

Previously, Google was internally using devices like the Acer Switch Alpha 12 and Intel NUC (Next Unit of Computing) to develop the operating system. The former is a 2-in-1 convertible tablet with a keyboard attachment, while the latter is a miniature desktop box.

As spotted by Android Police, Google recently listed its new Pixelbook as a “target device” for development and testing. The Made by Google Chromebook is most like the Acer device with a 12.3-inch touchscreen display and powerful Intel Core i5 or i7 processors.

Given the public development process that Google is taking with Fuchsia, instructions to install Fuchsia for each device are available on Github. With the Chrome OS device, users have to enable developer mode, with the OS installed from a USB device.

We’re likely years away from any sort of unveil, but the addition of Pixelbook support serves as somewhat of a hint to what we can expect from Fuchsia devices down the road.


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