The video above from the Wi-Fi Alliance shows the Wi-Fi Direct technology, which is technically supported by many Android devices and it allows for peer-to-peer wireless connections. The possibilities include sharing, screen mirroring, and syncing of data and services between devices without the need of a traditional access point or Internet connection. Wi-Fi Direct is based on the soon to be certified Wi-Fi Display standard that many reported Qualcomm would be the first to deliver with its Snapdragon S4 processors in Android devices by summer 2012. Now it looks like Texas Instruments might beat them to it with a report from Android and Me claiming devices powered by the company’s OMAP4 platform will likely hit the market first:

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Earlier this month at CES, Texas Instruments showed me their current implementation of WiFi Display running on several Android devices and I was genuinely impressed. First I witnessed screen mirroring, which was demonstrated by HD video streaming from a tablet to a TV. Next I got to wirelessly beam a full 3D game to a TV, while I controlled the on-screen character using the tablet’s built-in gyroscope. Texas Instruments also demoed another cool use case of projecting a mobile device’s display to a large screen and then issuing gesture controls to an application using the device’s front-facing camera.

The report claimed Texas Instruments will be first to deliver the technology in its current-generation OMAP4 processors, which cover a ton of Android devices including the Galaxy Nexus, RAZR, Droid 3, Nook Tablet, Kindle Fire, LG Spectrum, and many more. The Wi-Fi Display standard is expected to be certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance in Q2 2012 with the necessary firmware updates to enable the technology on devices expected to land in the summer. We will keep you posted when we learn more.

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