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Over the past several days you’ve probably heard a lot about the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 and its tendency to explode. Due a flaw with the battery, a small percentage of Galaxy Note 7 units have actually exploded. This triggered a global recall of every Galaxy Note 7 in consumer’s hands, however, since that recall was announced we’ve noticed quite a few people online saying that they don’t feel like they want to swap their device out, but you really should…

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Just yesterday a Reddit user posted that his Galaxy Note 7 had exploded while he was asleep. He woke up to find the phone completely fried, having charred the bed sheet in his hotel room and the carpet (not to mention a burned finger) after he knocked it to the ground. This occurred while using Samsung’s included charging cable.

For the damage, the hotel charged the user a bill of over $1,800 AUD (about $1,400 USD). Thankfully, he was able to get in touch with Samsung to take care of the situation. Since the user was on a business trip, Samsung set him up with a loaner device from a local store and agreed to take care of the hotel damage. Great job, Samsung, for taking care of the situation quickly.

Now, let’s get to what this means.

People, trade your devices in. Yes, the issue has only affected a small portion of owners, but is it really worth the risk? With yet another explosion on the books and with the cause of the problem confirmed to not be due to third-party or external reasons, it just makes sense to get in touch with Samsung and get a replacement. If you’re unsure of how to do this, Samsung has already set up an exchange program and worked out the details with US carriers, so really, just do it

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