Spell checker Stories February 26, 2013

Chrome 26 beta includes improved spell check with support for new languages

Google announced today on the Chrome Blog that it is promoting Chrome 26 to the beta channel and including a number of new features in the release. Among the most notable new features included in today’s Chrome Beta release is an improved default spell checker that brings support for additional languages like Korean, Tamil, and Albanian. Google also highlighted other new features included in the beta like the ability to sync custom dictionaries and “support for grammar, homonym and context-sensitive spell checking in English.”

Furthermore, for users who have enabled the “Ask Google for suggestions” spell check feature, we’re now rolling out support for grammar, homonym and context-sensitive spell checking in English, powered by the same technologies used by Google search. Support for additional languages is on the way.The new spell checking engine – which is also available in Google Docs – even understands proper nouns like “Justin Bieber” and “Skrillex,” so if you’re wondering how many Ns there are inDananananaykroyd, worry no more (there are four).

The new features will rollout to users on Chrome OS, Linux, and Windows in the “coming weeks” with Mac support some time after.

Spell checker Stories March 21, 2012

Google Docs can now spell check threw through the Web.

Software Engineer Yew Jin Lim took to the official Google Docs blog this afternoon to explain how the Internet is helping Google Docs get smarter. The ambiguous and ever-adapting Googlebot is able to crawl cyberspace and adapt to words. The resulting action enables Google to improve suggestions during misspelled queries in Google Search. Well now, the same process is applied to Google Docs…

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Spell checker Stories September 1, 2011

As reported by Google Operating System, Google will release a “smarter” spell checker in a future update of Chrome. Currently, Chrome only uses the dictionary to spell check, not taking context into consideration. The future update, however, will work like Google Search’s “did you mean” feature.

Google has been hesitant to add the updated spell checker citing privacy concerns. As Google Operating System explains, a JSON-RPC request is sent to the “did you mean” service in the background, where the context-menu will then be updated. It will be interesting to see how fast Google can get results to come back.

Everyone can use an Echo Dot: Just $50!

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