Korean Stories July 15, 2014

Google partners with Adobe to release unified Noto Sans CJK font family for Chinese, Japanese and Korean

Google has joined forces with Adobe to release a unified Noto Sans CJK font family for Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese and Korean, four languages that represent nearly one-quarter of readers worldwide. Noto Sans CJK is a high-quality Pan-CJK font family that aims to provide a richer reading experience to the East Asian community across operating systems and apps.

Google explained the technical details of the font family in a recent blog post:

Noto Sans CJK is a sans serif typeface designed as an intermediate style between the modern and traditional. It is intended to be a multi-purpose digital font for user interface designs, digital content, reading on laptops, mobile devices, and electronic books. Noto Sans CJK is provided in seven weights: Thin, Light, DemiLight, Regular, Medium, Bold, and Black.

Fully supporting CJK requires tens of thousands of characters—these languages share the majority of ideographic characters, but there are also characters that are unique to only one language or to a subset of the languages. One of the primary design goals of Noto Sans CJK is that each script should retain its own distinctive look, which follows regional conventions, while remaining harmonious with the others.

Adobe has released the same font family under the name Source Han Sans.

Korean Stories June 13, 2014

Citing “industry sources,” a super sketchy report from Korean publication iNews24 was posted at the end of May claiming that the upcoming LG G Watch could be shipping with a built-in, unremovable SIM Card. Other publications ran with this rumor, saying that it was truly possible despite the obvious skepticism that an Android Wear watch would have cellular capabilities. But we’ve unearthed some more information, potentially bringing a bit of credence to this wild rumor.

After said report started spreading across the Internet, we searched for the truth and uncovered FCC documents providing some evidence that the device will not be shipping with any cellular capabilities — at least not in the US, and not yet. These FCC filings were for a device labeled as ZNF-W100 (which likely just stands for  “watch” 100, with ZNF being the manufacturer’s code: LG).

But what we didn’t consider is that there might be more than one model. The FCC filing in the US shows no evidence of the W100 model touting a cellular radio, but what if there’s another model?

Enter the LG G Watch W105. expand full story

Korean Stories March 27, 2013

Google announced an update today to Google Translate for Android that brings an extremely useful feature for those who are traveling or in need of translations when without an Internet connection. Starting today, the updated Android app will now allow users running devices on Android 2.3 and up to access the service using downloadable offline language packages.

Google noted that there are currently around 50 languages available for offline use and detailed how to download the necessary packages through the app:

You can select [Offline Languages] in the app menu to see all the offline language packages available for download. To enable offline translation between any two languages, you just need to select them in the offline languages menu. Once the packages are downloaded, you’re good to go.

While the languages packages provide everything you need to get quick translations when offline, Google warned that the offline modes are “less comprehensive than their online equivalents” without explaining in detail.

Users of the updated app will also now be able to translate vertical text for Japanese, Chinese, and Korean—using their device’s camera.

The updated Google Translate app for Android is available now through Google Play.

Everyone can use an Echo Dot: Just $50!

Korean Stories February 26, 2013

Chrome 26 beta includes improved spell check with support for new languages

Google announced today on the Chrome Blog that it is promoting Chrome 26 to the beta channel and including a number of new features in the release. Among the most notable new features included in today’s Chrome Beta release is an improved default spell checker that brings support for additional languages like Korean, Tamil, and Albanian. Google also highlighted other new features included in the beta like the ability to sync custom dictionaries and “support for grammar, homonym and context-sensitive spell checking in English.”

Furthermore, for users who have enabled the “Ask Google for suggestions” spell check feature, we’re now rolling out support for grammar, homonym and context-sensitive spell checking in English, powered by the same technologies used by Google search. Support for additional languages is on the way.The new spell checking engine – which is also available in Google Docs – even understands proper nouns like “Justin Bieber” and “Skrillex,” so if you’re wondering how many Ns there are inDananananaykroyd, worry no more (there are four).

The new features will rollout to users on Chrome OS, Linux, and Windows in the “coming weeks” with Mac support some time after.

Korean Stories November 26, 2012

Samsung shows off how it stress tests its smartphones (Video)

The video above, posted by the official SamsungTomorrow YouTube channel (via Engadget), shows some of the stress tests Samsung puts its Galaxy smartphones through. The video is in Korean, but it’s pretty easy to see exactly what your Galaxy device goes through— from water and scratch resistant tests to a machine simulating a user a sitting on the device.

Samsung’s Smartphone Stress Test: Now, we live in a world where you cannot imagine it without smartphones. But, do you know how strong your smartphone is? Samsung is conducting various kinds of stress tests for its smartphones to make not only smarter but also stronger smartphones.

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