Google Home was announced earlier this month by Chromecast head Mario Queiroz. The team responsible for Google’s hit streaming media device headed up development of the Amazon Echo competitor because Home is essentially a “dressed-up version of Chromecast”, according to The Information.

Specifically, Google Home uses a similar ARM-based processor and Wi-Fi chips. According to iFixit, last year’s Chromecast is powered by a dual-core ARM processor from Marvell, 4GB of RAM, and a dual-band Wi-Fi chip that supports 802.11ac.

Home is essentially a Chromecast with the addition of a microphone, speaker, LED lights, and a better design with customizable fabric or metal bottoms. It is even powered by the same Linux-based OS used on the Chromecast, though Google has discussed powering future versions with Android. Voice commands will be sent to Google’s servers in order to be parsed.

The Information speculates that with the Chromecast being sold at $35, Google could undercut the $179 Echo by a significant amount. In its current iteration, the Chromecast is one of Google’s most successful hardware products, selling 3 million units in the past three years.

Google recently formed a new hardware division headed up by former Motorola chief Rick Osterloh. Chromecast has been moved into this division as Google works on a new suite of “living room” products to capture that market space.

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