constitutions Stories September 17, 2015

The constitutions of 13 countries now show up as Knowledge Graph results

Google is always expanding the information it offers at the top of search results, with the goal being to keep users within Google itself — no longer needing to navigate to external websites. Today, the Mountain View company has announced that it is adding constitutions from 13 different countries to the top of your search results page…

According to Google’s Inside Search blog:

The Constitute Project helps people access, compare and analyze the world’s constitutions. Now we’re adding more of this content to our search results, so you can find the full text for the United States Constitution—or constitutions from 12 other countries—right at the top of your search results page. To try it out, type (or say) “constitution” into Google Search or the Google App and a box will pop up with the Preamble for the United States Constitution and a drop-down menu where you can see all of the accompanying articles and amendments.

The new feature comes in partnership with the Constitute Project, a group that hopes to give people more access to world constitutions. Of course, the United States constitutions is one of the many you’ll be able to access. Besides the US, there’s Afghanistan, Bhutan, Estonia, Finland, France, Iceland, Japan, Laos, Latvia, Micronesia, Norway and Ukraine.

Just head over to Google and search for “constitution of [your country]” and you’ll be given many drop down menus that let you get a full glimpse of these documents. Of course, Google says that it is looking into adding more countries in the future.

constitutions Stories September 23, 2013

Google today announced that its Ideas think tank is teaming up with the Comparative Constitutions Project to build a new online tool called “Constitute” that aims to digitize all the world’s constitutions and make them searchable to everyone online.

Constitute enables people to browse and search constitutions via curated and tagged topics, as well as by country and year. The Comparative Constitutions Project cataloged and tagged nearly 350 themes, so people can easily find and compare specific constitutional material. This ranges from the fairly general, such as “Citizenship” and “Foreign Policy,” to the very specific, such as “Suffrage and turnouts” and “Judicial Autonomy and Power.”

Google Ideas Product Manager Sara Sinclair Brody says the company hopes the new tool will help citizens learn more about their own constitutions, but also “arm drafters with a better tool for constitution design and writing.”  expand full story

Powered by WordPress.com VIP