Google Cultural Institute Stories September 13, 2016

New natural history content in Google Arts & Culture brings dinosaurs to Google Cardboard

The Google Arts & Culture app was introduced last year as little more than a web wrapper, but it got beefed up with some more features — like Google Cardboard support — earlier this summer. But what good is such an app without dinosaurs? Today, Google has introduced a plethora of new natural history content — which, basically, means dinosaurs — in partnership with the Natural History Museum and 62 other museums and foundations. And it’s awesome…

Google Cultural Institute Stories July 19, 2016

Last year, Google introduced an Arts & Culture app to showcase its collection of digitized art and other projects. The Google Cultural Institute is releasing an updated version of the app that is more feature-rich with a Google Cardboard VR component and a new Art Recognizer tool in select museums.

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Google Cultural Institute Stories August 1, 2014

Google’s Cultural Institute – which puts online materials previously only available to visitors to particular museums, archives and institutes – has taken on its biggest challenge yet. Google is working with Europeana to bring online the collections of more than 2000 museums, archives and institutes.

It’s a tremendous undertaking to bring Europe’s rich cultural heritage online, one that can only be achieved by both private and public effort. As this collaboration shows, both Europeana and Google share similar visions – allowing people around the world to explore Europe’s cultural and scientific heritage from prehistory to the modern day …

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Deal: Get Pixelbook at 25% off: $750!

Google Cultural Institute Stories June 6, 2014

Google has created a new Cultural Institute collection to mark the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings that were instrumental in the allies winning World War 2.

The massive collection of hundreds of photos, letters and documents helps bring to life the largest seaborne invasion in history, with 130,000 British, American and Canadian troops landing on the beaches of Normandy, France. Almost one in ten of them were killed.

The collection includes Franklin D. Roosevelt’s prayer, complete with handwritten amendments, and top-secret progress reports from Eisenhower to Marshall …  expand full story

Google Cultural Institute Stories November 19, 2013

See Abraham Lincoln’s handwritten Gettysburg Address in hi-res at Google Cultural Institute

There’s nothing that makes history real quite like seeing original, handwritten documents. Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address was just 272 words long and reportedly took just two minutes to deliver, yet has been widely recognised as one of the most important speeches ever given, playing a key role in re-uniting the USA after the civil war and reminding the nation of its founding principles.

You can now view all five handwritten copies in high resolution at Google’s Cultural Institute website on the 150th anniversary of the famous speech. The online exhibit is supported by contemporary drawings, plans and reports and is well worth a visit.

Google Cultural Institute Stories July 16, 2013

Google captures 360-degree Street View imagery from atop the Eiffel Tower

Google has teamed up with the Eiffel Tower Operating Company in Paris to capture Street View imagery from on top of the Eiffel Tower for the first time ever. Not only is it making the Street View panoramas captured with its Street View Trolley available to all, it’s also making “50 archival images, plans, engravings and photos telling the story of the Eiffel Tower’s development and social impact in the 19th century” available through its Google Cultural Institute project:

The first exhibition presents the birth of the Eiffel Tower from the initial idea until its realization. You can then followthe construction of the monument step-by-step through photos and sketches. Details on the inauguration and the first visitors lie in the third exhibition, with photos of people admiring the Paris vista on the opening day leading into today’s Street View imagery from the top floor. Did you know that during the Tower’s inauguration for the Universal Exhibition of 1889, the elevators were not yet in service but 12,000 people per day rushed to climb the 1710 steps leading to the top?

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