Update: While Google has not commented directly on Porsche’s reported rejection of Android Auto, the company made a statement to The Verge in which it denied that it currently collects any of the data mentioned in the original report. It does not go as far as saying that it has not requested access to such data.

“We take privacy very seriously and do not collect the data the Motor Trend article claims such as throttle position, oil temp, and coolant temp,” Google said in a statement to The Verge. “Users opt in to share information with Android Auto that improves their experience, so the system can be hands-free when in drive, and provide more accurate navigation through the car’s GPS.”

Sportscar manufacturer Porsche has rejected Android Auto for the 2017 version of its famous 911, saying that Google demands access to too much data, reports Motor Trend.

As part of the agreement an automaker would have to enter with Google, certain pieces of data must be collected and [sent] back to Mountain View, California. Stuff like vehicle speed, throttle position, coolant and oil temp, engine revs—basically Google wants a complete OBD2 dump whenever someone activates Android Auto.

Porsche has approved Apple’s CarPlay, as this requires access to only a single piece of data: whether or not the car is moving.

Porsche’s parent company Volkswagen is, however, pressing full speed ahead with Google’s in-car infotainment system, stating back in July that almost every 2016 Volkswagen model in almost every trim level will get Android Auto support.

Android Auto got a user-interface refresh back in August.

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