The Google Pixel and Pixel XL phones have just been announced — and alongside the confirmation of everything we pretty much knew already, various bits of information have arrived regarding the bigger meaning behind what Pixel actually means for Google, and two things stood out in particular…

For one, we have a clarification on what these “Phones by Google” actually are. And, to erase all doubts, we can now confidently say that yes, these are made by Google. Both Bloomberg and The Verge, in interviews with the people behind the phone, have confirmed as much.

In its behind-the-scenes story, Bloomberg got word that the Pixel phones are, in fact, “onceptualized, designed, engineered and tested in-house”.

While Google has contracted HTC to assemble the Pixel phones, Osterloh says the approach is no different than Apple’s partnership with iPhone builder Foxconn. Flip the Pixel over and you’ll see “Made by Google,” another tip of the hat to Apple, which has long made much of the fact that its phones are “Designed by Apple in California.” Osterloh says Google will never say the Pixel is co-engineered with anyone else. He proudly proclaims, “It’s ours.”

The rumored HTC “partnership”, in fact, sees the Taiwanese manufacturer simply as the two devices’ assembler, much like Foxconn handles the iPhone’s actual construction. “Hardcore Android fans may know that HTC is the “Original Device Manufacturer” for the Pixel, but Google says its phone isn’t based on any HTC phone and the “seller of record” for the phone will be Google,” reads The Verge’s piece. But this responsibility takeover is apparently expanding beyond that.

A Huawei-made “Nexus” 7-inch tablet is still in the pipeline as far as we’re aware, but it seems that device won’t sport the Nexus brand. As per The Verge‘s report, Google has “no plans” to bring any new Nexus-branded devices to the market. The Google Nexus Twitter account sort of confirmed this, too, giving customers a farewell of sorts and refocusing attention on support for existing products.

Are you happy to see Google’s switch towards this closer and yet more focused, end-to-end approach? Let us know in the comments below.

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