Chrome for Android goes almost ‘entirely open source’

chromium-logo

Launched in September 2008, Google’s Chrome browser is now dominant in its share of the desktop web browser market, with approximately 1 in 4 Internet users interfacing with the web using the browser. What many Chrome users probably don’t know, however, is that it’s actually based off the open source Chromium browser, also developed by Google. Up until today Chrome for Android differed from its desktop counterpart in that it’s codebase wasn’t open source – meaning, the code for the app wasn’t publicly available for other developers to view, modify, and build upon. That changed today.

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Gartner: Chromebook sales up 24 percent over 2014, still huge in education

ASUS Chromebook C201

Gartner today released the results of a report finding that Chromebooks in 2015 have continued to see double-digit year-over-year growth for Google with education still as the primary market for browser-based computers. 7.3 million Chromebook units are expected to be sold in 2015, a 27 percent increase over 2014, while 72 percent of those sales are expected to be from the education sector.

Screen Shot 2015-05-21 at 9.18.22 AM

In the above chart breaking down Chromebook sales for 2014 by region and segment, you can see education held the lion’s share in all the major markets Google sells to, with consumer sales coming in second, and sales to the business segment trailing far behind – save for in Asia Pacific, where those latter two are reversed. Read more

Google’s ‘Tone’ Chrome extension lets you share URLs with nearby computers using only sound

Researchers at Google have today launched a wacky new experimental Chrome extension that lets you share the URL of your current browser tab with nearby Chrome users only using sound. It’s called ‘Tone’ and to use it, both you and receiver of the link you would like to send need to be in earshot of one another, be using Chrome with the Tone extension installed, and have computers with decent speakers and microphones… Read more

Google-sponsored study says ad malware affects millions of users

An example of a webpage made almost unusable by injected ads

An example of a webpage made completely unusable by injected ads

A Google-sponsored study carried out by the University of California, Berkeley and Santa Barbara found “tens of millions of instances” of ad malware in the course of just a few months. In all, they found that a staggering 5.5% of unique IP addresses – representing millions of users – were affected.

Ad injection malware drops its own ads into whatever web page an infected machine displays. Revenue from these ads is filtered through ad networks, where genuine companies end up paying the bills, effectively stealing revenue that should have gone to the websites themselves.

Some of this malware goes further than simply injecting ads …  Read more

Next version of Chrome will stop trusting many Chinese websites as Google responds to security breach

cnnic

Users trying to connect to many websites in China through Chrome will soon see a message that the website’s security certificate is not trusted, advising against proceeding.

In a far-reaching response to a recently security breach, Google plans to cease recognizing all web security certificates issued by the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) – which includes many government, banking and ecommerce sites in the country …  Read more

Google releases new Chromebook Pixel 2 with USB C fast charging, wide angle camera: $999/$1299

Google just announced an updated version of its Chromebook Pixel notebook alongside a new online Google Store where it plans to sell all of its Google branded devices.

The big standout feature for the new Chromebook Pixel is USB C, the new USB standard that Apple just introduced on its new 12-inch MacBook this week. Google has one USB C port on each side. Read more

Acer announces $179 Chromebox appendage, launching late Sep in U.S. and Canada

Acer Chromebox CXI VESA Mount

Some of us are old enough to remember when desktop computers were large towers that you stored under your desk; these days, you can hide the desktop PC behind your monitor.

Acer has today announced a new Chromebox based on its C7 series Chromebook, the Chromebox CXI. The compact format makes it suitable for mounting on a monitor stand …  Read more

Don’t freak out, Chrome’s Incognito mode has a new look

Incognito-Makeover

If you decide to privately browse the web for one reason or another, you might notice something a little different when you go into Incognito mode. Back in April, Google revealed that it was working on giving Chrome’s privacy tab a bit of a makeover and while its functionality pretty much remains unchanged, its landing page’s mascot no longer looks like the neighborhood watch guy.

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Royal Caribbean International brings Street View tours to its cruise ships

Cruise

It’s summertime in these here United States and while taking your family on a cross-country road trip to Walley World sounds like a great time, Royal Caribbean International would like you to reconsider. The company recently entered a partnership with Google’s Business View to provide would-be customers with virtual tours of its cruise ships. Loaded with blurred out pictures of guests, this panoramic sales pitch lets you check out activities like simulated surfing, zip lining, rock climbing and fine dining, all without the risk of contracting a mystery illness or being hijacked by pirates.

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Google’s Cube lets aspiring DJs mix up to six music videos at once

You know what’s better than one music video? Six music videos playing at the same time! Google’s Creative Lab has put together an interactive virtual media box called the Cube that lets users mix up to six simultaneous videos while jamming to a single track. Supported by Chrome and most modern Android devices, would-be DJs can use their mouse or finger to cycle through different video sequences while a song plays in the background.

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Google no longer accepting legacy packaged Chrome apps, support completely ending in June of 2015

 

Chrome-Desktop

In 2010 Google took steps towards separating its Chrome browser and the way its apps operated. Unlike traditional web-based applications, the software didn’t have URLs or navigation buttons, making it feel more like native desktop programs. This new breed of Chrome apps were also capable of working offline, connecting with peripherals and delivering desktop notifications.

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