Adobe Systems Stories July 15, 2014

Google now flags Flash content in search results on Android/iOS devices, saving clicks

If you’ve ever been frustrated by visiting a website on your smartphone or tablet and finding it won’t work because it uses Flash, you’ll welcome the latest Google initiative: it is now flagging Flash content in its search results, warning that the site may not work on your device.

Starting today, we will indicate to searchers when our algorithms detect pages that may not work on their devices. For example, Adobe Flash is not supported on iOS devices or on Android versions 4.1 and higher, and a page whose contents are mostly Flash may be noted

As Google notes, Android abandoned Flash support as of Jelly Bean due to reliability, security and performance concerns. Adobe has been forced to issue a succession of security updates to Flash, the most recent being two emergency updates earlier this year. Google says it hopes the move, coupled to Web Fundamentals and Web Starter Kit initiatives for developers will encourage the use of HTML5 in place of Flash.

Adobe Systems Stories January 27, 2014

Google does U-turn on magazine-style web layouts in favor of faster browsing

Google has changed its mind about supporting an Adobe tool to allow magazine-style layout on web pages after deciding that the technology would have too great an impact on browsing speeds, reports CNET.

The technology, known as CSS Regions, allows text to flow around irregularly-shaped objects, as in the example above. Google had initially supported the project, part of a move by Adobe to bring Flash-style capabilities into native web standards, intending to incorporate the code into its Blink browser engine.

Google Chrome programmer Eric Seidel says that Adobe’s current approach has too great a performance hit.

I believe Blink’s focus this year must be on mobile and specifically mobile performance…I have come to understand that Regions both does not play well with existing performance optimizations [and] impedes ongoing simplification and optimization work to our core rendering code,” Seidel said about his reversal of opinion on CSS Regions. “Regions addresses some very real deficiencies of the Web platform. But I believe Blink (hopefully with Adobe’s help) will need to find other simpler/smaller ways to address these deficiencies.”

Another Google Chrome programmer echoed this view, stating that while magazine-style layouts were appealing, Google’s priority is maximising browser performance with web apps in mind.

Adobe Systems Stories April 19, 2012

Judge orders Google, Apple to face ‘no-poach’ lawsuit

Reuters reported that a judge rejected Google and Apple’s bid last night to have an antitrust lawsuit dismissed. The lawsuit claimed the companies illegally entered “no-poach” agreements in an effort to stop competitors from stealing talent:

District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, rejected the companies’ bid to dismiss claims brought under the Sherman Act and California state law, in a decision released Wednesday night. […] The proposed class action lawsuit was brought by five software engineers, who accused the companies of conspiring to depress employee pay by eliminating competition for skilled labor.

Other defendants in the case included Intel, Adobe Systems, Intuit Walt Disney Co’s Pixar, and Lucasfilm.

This Aside is cross-posted at 9to5Mac.

(Image via Zoknowsgaming)

Adobe Systems Stories February 22, 2012

Google’s Chrome browser has long released with a built-in Flash Player plug-in—the result of a technology partnership between the Internet giant and Flash maker Adobe. Though Adobe still allows customers to download a standalone Flash Player plug-in for Windows, OS X or Linux, the company announced today that the Flash Player plug-in for Linux after version 11.2 would only be available with Chrome browser distribution. The Linux plug-in will no longer be available as a direct download from Adobe. While one could suspect this news foreshadows broader policy changes on Windows and OS X, Adobe insisted that is not the case.

Flash Player will continue to support browsers using non-”Pepper” plugin APIs on platforms other than Linux.

Additionally, it will continue supporting Flash Player 11.2 on Linux for years to come. “Adobe will continue to provide security updates to non-Pepper distributions of Flash Player 11.2 on Linux for five years from its release,” wrote the company in a blog post

expand full story

Adobe Systems Stories December 16, 2011

It ain’t dead yet: Flash 11.1 delivered to Android 4.0 ICS

Those ICS early adopters who want to browse all the Internets, including the ones that are Flash enabled, got some good news today that Flash 11.1 is ready, right on time, for Android 4.0.  Currently available in the Android Market, the release date actually says Dec 12th wich was a few days before the release […]

Adobe Systems Stories December 13, 2011

Getting the user interface of a mobile application right down to the pixel level is a daunting task which often requires a lot of testing. To help Android developers get a better feel of what their designs will look like on an actual device, Adobe introduced a tool aptly named the Android Design Preview Tool. It takes some pain out of UI work by mirroring your desktop to your Android device, which helps mitigate guesstimating the appearance of the user interface elements and avoid wasting time compiling a build and syncing it to the device in order to test out each tweak. The new tool joins Adobe’s suite of Android utilities comprised of the Android Asset Studio and UI Prototyping Stencils.

expand full story

Everyone can use an Echo Dot: Just $50!

Powered by WordPress.com VIP