Chinese Stories September 4, 2015

According to a new report out this morning from The Information, Google is planning a re-entry into China which could come as early as this fall. Among other initiatives, the report says that Google is planning to launch a special version of its Google Play Store app marketplace made specifically for the Chinese market, as well as bringing support for its Android Wear mobile operating system to the country… expand full story

Chinese Stories July 15, 2015

nexus2cee_commoderp_thumb

As discovered by a commenter over at Android Police, the “Commodore” handset that went viral yesterday — largely due to nostalgia — is actually the Orgtec WaPhone, a device that is completely and utterly boring and not notable at all. We knew that this was probably the case considering Commodore’s history, but it wasn’t until now that we found the exact phone that the “Commodore PET” is based off of. And by “based off of,” we mean “an exact replica of.” expand full story

Chinese Stories May 14, 2015

unnamed-2

Huawei has today sent out invites to an event happening on June 2nd, and it looks like this date might mark the first time the Chinese company will launch consumer hardware in North America. According to the invite, the event in New York City is scheduled to show off “what’s new from Huawei” and provide the latest information on the “company’s US strategy.”

expand full story

Chinese Stories August 7, 2014

Fleksy Android keyboard expands language support with Arabic and Chinese

Fleksy today updated their Android keyboard with support for new themes and more languages, Arabic and Chinese. The Arabic keyboard is launching in beta today, with the Chinese version coming sometime in the near future.

Chinese Stories August 5, 2014

internationalized_email_address2

Google announced today that it’s adding support for non-Latin characters in email addresses in Gmail. That means that email address names that contain accented characters or those that are written in a script like Chinese can now be both sent and received from Gmail: expand full story

Chinese Stories July 15, 2014

Google partners with Adobe to release unified Noto Sans CJK font family for Chinese, Japanese and Korean

Google has joined forces with Adobe to release a unified Noto Sans CJK font family for Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese and Korean, four languages that represent nearly one-quarter of readers worldwide. Noto Sans CJK is a high-quality Pan-CJK font family that aims to provide a richer reading experience to the East Asian community across operating systems and apps.

Google explained the technical details of the font family in a recent blog post:

Noto Sans CJK is a sans serif typeface designed as an intermediate style between the modern and traditional. It is intended to be a multi-purpose digital font for user interface designs, digital content, reading on laptops, mobile devices, and electronic books. Noto Sans CJK is provided in seven weights: Thin, Light, DemiLight, Regular, Medium, Bold, and Black.

Fully supporting CJK requires tens of thousands of characters—these languages share the majority of ideographic characters, but there are also characters that are unique to only one language or to a subset of the languages. One of the primary design goals of Noto Sans CJK is that each script should retain its own distinctive look, which follows regional conventions, while remaining harmonious with the others.

Adobe has released the same font family under the name Source Han Sans.

Chinese Stories May 26, 2014

Sketchy leak suggests cheaper HTC One M8 ‘Ace’ variant coming June 3 w/ single camera

We told you about the rumored HTC One M8 “Ace” in previous reports, but now some leaked specifications from sketchy Chinese website ifanr say that the purportedly cheaper phone will sport the recently-popular Snapdragon 801 processor, 2 GB of RAM, a high-resolution 5-inch display, and the latest versions of Android as well as HTC’s Sense technology (via Android Central).

Chinese Stories December 18, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 9.58.21 AM

The Android hardware market in the US better make some shelf space as Chinese manufacturer Meizu states its intentions to come stateside. The company announced its plans to jump-start its entry into the US at the Consumer Electronics Show next month.

expand full story

Chinese Stories March 27, 2013

Google announced an update today to Google Translate for Android that brings an extremely useful feature for those who are traveling or in need of translations when without an Internet connection. Starting today, the updated Android app will now allow users running devices on Android 2.3 and up to access the service using downloadable offline language packages.

Google noted that there are currently around 50 languages available for offline use and detailed how to download the necessary packages through the app:

You can select [Offline Languages] in the app menu to see all the offline language packages available for download. To enable offline translation between any two languages, you just need to select them in the offline languages menu. Once the packages are downloaded, you’re good to go.

While the languages packages provide everything you need to get quick translations when offline, Google warned that the offline modes are “less comprehensive than their online equivalents” without explaining in detail.

Users of the updated app will also now be able to translate vertical text for Japanese, Chinese, and Korean—using their device’s camera.

The updated Google Translate app for Android is available now through Google Play.

Chinese Stories November 9, 2012

[tweet https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/266973350025367553]

Many reports are coming in that Chinese users are having trouble accessing a number of Google’s web products. There is no word on the exact cause of the service disruptions, but The Wall Street Journal noted Google’s Transpareny Report website shows “a precipitous drop in traffic in China starting more than eight hours ago,” although the site doesn’t list the services as completely inaccessible in the country. Google provided a statement to WSJ confirming the interruptions do not appear to be on its end:

“We’ve checked and there’s nothing wrong on our end,” a Google spokeswoman said in a prepared statement.

The Washington Post reported “Users with special VPN (virtual private network) services,” which many Chinese users take advantage of to access banned sites like Facebook, are still able to access Google’s services.  expand full story

Chinese Stories October 10, 2011

Over the past 60 hours, Chinese officials have begun blocking Gmail and the Android Market running on Android devices reports Penn Olson. In the report, Penn Olson says that Gmail can’t send a single email and the Market is incredibly slow, making it utterly useless. The ban is currently taking place across many ISPs and mobile carriers around the country.

As the report mentions, this ban won’t affect that many Android users in China. Many use other email providers and other app markets that have been made available. But at any rate, why would China begin to make this move? Now there’s no confirming this.. but what if it was a possibility:

Come to think of it, it might be related to how Google+ this weekend enabled the Dalai Lama to chat with the Archbishop Desmond Tutu – a virtual equivalent of the planned face-to-face birthday meeting in South Africa that Chinese authorities were so utterly desperate to stop.

..just a little something to think about.

Powered by WordPress VIP