Servers Stories October 9, 2012

New DoubleClick ad verification tool enables ‘smarter media buying’ [Video]

DoubleClick for Advertisers introduced a new tool today for agencies and marketers, called “DoubleClick Verification,” that acts as a built-in ad verification solution and subsequently promotes smarter media buying.

DoubleClick is a Google subsidiary that develops and provides Internet ad serving services. According to the official DoubleClick Advertiser blog, the new tool’s benefits include:

  • Accessible. It’s as simple as signing in to DFA and navigating to the reporting interface to start using DoubleClick Verification. There’s no need to implement another tag or sign another contract to get started.
  • Holistic. DoubleClick Verification not only provides a seamless experience for clients, it’s enabled across all ad impressions and campaigns in DFA today. In the future, as part of DoubleClick Digital Marketing, it will cover the entire scope of your display buy across the platform.
  • Actionable. The information in DoubleClick Verification helps you to reconcile the terms of your media buy with your media partners. It answers the questions of did my ads serve as they were intended?

DoubleClick Verification currently offers website content monitoring for identifying content issues with ads and it allows partners to customize content profiles for defining safe or non-safe websites.

For more information on today’s news: Download DoubleClick’s “Smarter Media Buying with Ad Verification” white paper, visit DoubleClick’s blog post, watch the video above, or register for an upcoming “Introducing Ad Verification with DoubleClick” webinar on Oct. 17 at 1 p.m. EST.

Servers Stories March 15, 2012

A story from Wired today interviewed Chris Sharp, the GM of content and cloud at data center Equinix where Google happens to lease space alongside some of its biggest competitors. Sharp told an interesting story about Google removing all the light bulbs above its server cages a couple years back. The company then required those working on the servers to wear helmets with lights:

About two years ago, Chris Sharp says, Google unscrewed all the light bulbs inside the hardware cages it occupied at that Equinix data center. “They had us turn off all overhead lights too, and their guys put on those helmets with lights you see miners wear,” he tells Wired. “Presumably, they were bringing up custom-built gear they didn’t want anyone else to see.”

The reason Google did this, according to Sharp, is “there’s a lot of valuable intellectual property.” He added that many companies try to conceal equipment, but he was “always amazed by Google and the helmets.” As Wired pointed out, Google builds its own servers and associated gear and most likely does not want competitors leasing space at Equinix to get a look. expand full story

Servers Stories February 18, 2012

As the CyanogenMod team works to continue releasing new “nightly builds” of its custom Android firmware, it just released a blog post this morning asking for donations from the community. The team said it needed donations to purchase new servers to keep releasing new builds.

CyanogenMod is not a for-profit business. We are just a bunch of geeks, trying to make our phones more awesome. The donations we get currently cover our operating costs and occasionally go towards developer devices. This time, I need to ask for help from the community for something a bit larger. We need to purchase these servers in order to bring the build infrastructure back to full capacity.

The CyanogenMod community quickly jumped into action, and the CyanogenMod team earned the money it needed (and perhaps a bit more) in only a few short hours to purchase the necessary servers. The team will buy “Xeon-class boxes with lots of RAM” next week. Check out the full statement below: expand full story

Deal: Get Pixelbook at 25% off: $750!

Servers Stories February 14, 2012

Google has announced on their Official Google Blog that Google DNS is now the world’s largest DNS service, processing a whopping 70 billion requests a day. Google’s DNS efforts make for faster load times if you choose to use the service. Google describes DNS as, “If you had to look up hundreds or thousands of phone numbers every day, you’d want a directory that was fast, secure and correct.”

We launched Google Public DNS in December 2009 to help make the web faster for everyone. Today, we’re no longer an experimental service. We’re the largest public DNS service in the world, handling an average of more than 70 billion requests a day.

Google also dropped word that they currently have over 10 million users using the service. 70% of Google DNS’ traffic comes from outside of the United States, with key markets being North America, South America, Europe, and an emerging Asia.

Not using Google DNS? Check out how.

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