SoC Stories July 15, 2015

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OnePlus came out not long ago to say that the upcoming OnePlus 2 will sport the Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor. This obviously caused a bit of concern in the community considering the system-on-a-chip’s mixed history with heat problems, but the company reassured us that it was going with some kind of updated “version 2.1” of the chip that didn’t have as many problems — and they said they were optimizing it themselves, too.

The company touted this as some kind of selling point for the device over the year’s other Snapdragon 810 handsets, most notably the HTC One M9 and the LG G Flex 2. AnandTech even tested the v2.1 chip to make sure that the company’s claims were legitimate, and it turned out they were. But what the company didn’t say was that v2.1 is already (today!) being built into other handsets. And that includes the HTC One M9… expand full story

SoC Stories January 22, 2015

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In early December, it was reported that Qualcomm was having some problems with its next-generation Snapdragon 810 chip. The SoC was said to be overheating at certain voltages, and this raised concerns that the next slew of flagships coming in early 2015 might see delays. LG then went on to announce its G Flex 2 smartphone at CES 2015, effectively squashing rumors about the 810 that had spread just about a month earlier.

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SoC Stories December 9, 2014

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The Galaxy Note 4, Samsung’s current flagship phablet, is already available in two variations: one with a Samsung Exynos 7 processor (SM-N910C), and one with a Snapdragon 805 (SM-N910S). The difference between them is almost negligible, but a rumor this morning out of the fairly-reliable-for-Samsung-rumors SamMobile suggests that Samsung is testing another variation of the Note 4, this time with Snapdragon’s upcoming 810 system-on-a-chip.

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SoC Stories October 16, 2014

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Samsung revealed its new Exynos 7 Octa today, a 20nm setup loaded with four ARMv8 Cortex A57 cores and four Cortex A53 cores in a big.LITTLE configuration. This allows any of the chip’s cores to be active as needed, which also contributes to the Exynos 7 Octa’s efficient performance.

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SoC Stories August 23, 2014

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It seems as if Google’s Project Ara modular smartphone project is coming along nicely, despite a few manufacturing setbacks. There was apparently a problem with manufacturing devices for those who won units at Google I/O, but Google yesterday announced some exciting developments: the third iteration of Ara is planned to sport a custom-made system-on-a-chip made in collaboration with Rockchip, which is going to be made with the unique form factor of the device in mind.

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SoC Stories April 16, 2014

LG to will partner with TSMC to produce mobile processors

LG will soon try its luck at designing mobile processors in the near future, a company spokesperson recently confirmed. The South Korea-based electronics maker will reportedly contract Taiwan-based TSMC to manufacture its processors. According to The Korea Herald, the company’s in-house chips could possibly show up in LG’s rumored G3 smartphone, which the outfit hopes to announce in the next couple of months.

As for the chip’s build, it’s reportedly based on four 2.2GHz Cortex-A15 cores and four Cortex-A7 cores clocked at 1.7GHz. By entering the chip making business, LG will further its rivalry with Samsung, which currently produces and manufactures its own Exynos processors line. In addition to LG handsets, the company’s new chips could possibly be used in other third-party devices.

(via Phone Arena)

SoC Stories January 13, 2012

Chipmaker Texas Instruments placed its OMAP 4 application processors in many smartphone, tablet and e-reader devices last year, but the company debuted the first reference design demo running its latest OMAP 5 chip and Android 4.0 at CES 2012, and Texas Instruments’ Vice President said it is “way ahead of Apple.”

The device is a chunky reference design, but its responsiveness while swiping through the Ice Cream Sandwich operating system is impressive (as seen in the video below). The demo’s video playback is fluid, and Texas Instruments said the OMAP 5 could push 1080P content at 60 frames per second or more.

Read below for more information.

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SoC Stories September 12, 2011

Anandtech has published some interesting findings based on their extensive Samsung Galaxy S II review. It’s the first smartphone to use the graphics processing unit based on the Mali-400 core from ARM Holdings, a fables chip maker from the UK. In fact, Samsung has engineered and manufactured its own system-on-a-chip solution for the handset.

They call it the Exynos 4210 and it combines a dual-core Cortex-A9 CPU core and the aforementioned Mali-400 GPU sporting four cores. The resulting performance, says Anandtech, is comparable to Texas Instruments OMAP 4 chip that incorporates Imagination Technologies’ PowerVR SGX540 GPU core. However, the quad-core 1.2GHz Exynos 4210 probably won’t hold a candle to iPhone 5, which will likely carry the same dual-core processor-GPU combo as the iPad 2’s 1GHz A5 chip:

Samsung implemented a 4-core version of the Mali-400 in the 4210 and its resulting performance is staggering as you can see above. Although it’s still not as fast as the PowerVR SGX 543MP2 found in the iPad 2, it’s anywhere from 1.7 – 4x faster than anything that’s shipping in a smartphone today.

Interestingly, and per the GL Benchmark seen in the above image, the Exynos 4210 is more than twice as fast compared to the Galaxy Tab 10.1 that runs Nvidia’s Tegra 2 chi. It’s also nearly four times speedier than iPhone 4’s 800 MHz A4 chip which has the PowerVT SGX535 GPU core. However, the 4210 falls short in the triangle throughput department.

The publication this this could be a big disadvantage over the iPad 2’s A5 processor that clocks nine times the graphics performance of the original iPad’s A4 chip. Triangle throughput is important in graphics-intensive games and will become key in “future games that may scale along that vector rather than simply increasing pixel shader complexity”. The video of Anandtech’s Samsung Galaxy S II review is right after the break.

Cross-posted on 9to5Mac.com.

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