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Today during its annual I/O developers conference, Google revealed a bevy of new products and services, however a particular presentation managed to stand out among the rest. Shortly after previewing its next version of Android, the company started talking about Chromebooks. Not exactly the longest segment of the show, Mountain View’s focus appeared to be bridging the gap between Chromebooks and Android.

A demonstration by Google’s head of Android, Sundar Pichai revealed that Chromebook owners will soon be able to unlock their Chrome OS-powered laptop simply by having their device nearby. In addition to loading up a user profile, this feature will sign you in to multiple applications and services. Another standout moment during Google’s Chromebook segment was the revelation that phone calls and text messages from your smartphone will eventually be viewable from your desktop.

While neither of these features are new ideas, they reward consumers invested in Google’s ecosystem and have the potential to attract new users. Another interesting portion of Pichai’s presentation discussed plans to move Android apps to Chromebooks. At first it sounds like a novelty, but this could be an easy way to attract casual customers that are normally tethered to their smartphones.

This transition is in its early stages, but if Google plays its cards right, the company’s laptop alternative could become an attractive companion for Android users looking to stay connected to their favorite apps and services. Mountain View is making similar moves with its new Android Auto and Android Wear platforms, placing a huge emphasis on Google-powered devices communicating with each other, which has the potential to be huge incentive for people to remain in the search giant’s ecosystem. We’re going to put a pin in this subject and continue to revisit it as things evolve.

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