Chrome 78 Stories September 20

Following version 77’s release on Android, Mac, Windows, and Linux, the next beta release of Google’s browser is rolling out. The Chrome 78 beta will feature a “click-to-call” feature from desktop to Android, theming, and dedicated Chrome OS settings.

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Chrome 78 Stories August 28

Sometimes when trying to put in a password, it’s handy to be able to check what you typed before hitting submit. Some websites have created their own ways of temporarily revealing the password, but many haven’t yet. Microsoft wants to make revealing your typed password a consistent experience, available on every site you browse, in Google Chrome and their own Chromium-based Edge, by adding a new button to password fields.

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Chrome 78 Stories August 23

It’s almost impossible to browse the web these days without being inundated by sites asking if they can send you notifications. Infuriatingly, these notification requests even appear as dialogs that take over your screen on Chrome for Android. Google is working on a new way for Chrome and Chrome OS to deal with requests for notification access, including blocking them automatically.

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Chrome 78 Stories August 21

When browsing the web, sometimes you’ll come across an image that you want to know a bit more about, and one of the best ways to do that is through Google Lens. As it stands, you need to save the image to your phone, switch to Google Lens, and scan the image that way. Soon, you’ll be able to share an image directly to Google Lens from Chrome for Android.

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Chrome 78 Stories August 15

Earlier this year, Google created “Password Checkup,” a tool that checks if any of your passwords have been revealed in an online data breach, as an extension for desktop Chrome. In the near future, the leak detection part of Password Checkup will become a default feature of Google Chrome instead of an optional extension.

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Chrome 78 Stories August 12

Late last year, we uncovered a list of devices that would never be able to support Chrome OS’s Linux apps (Crostini). At the time, we noted that the second-generation Chromebook Pixel from 2015 was not on this list, and that it in fact stood a chance of getting the necessary upgrades to support Linux apps. It seems that eight more devices are following suit to allow their owners to run Linux apps.

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