dxomark Stories October 3, 2017

DxOMark is a recognized way — even if it doesn’t really mean all that much — to know how one mobile camera compares to another. Recently it’s been awarding higher scores than ever before to cameras hitting the market. Just last month the iPhone 8 Plus was crowned the king of mobile photography by a pretty solid margin, and today, the Galaxy Note 8 has just matched that camera.

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dxomark Stories April 12, 2016

The HTC 10 sits atop DxOMark’s camera ranking alongside the Galaxy S7 edge

HTC may have been given props over the past few years for things such as design, display and audio quality as well as the generally smooth performances of its high-end devices, but the company has often struggled trying to deliver a compelling camera experience.

While our very own review of the just announced 10 is in the making, the camera experts over at DxOMark have already put the 12MP shooter through its paces, and the results seem nothing short of excellent…

dxomark Stories October 28, 2015

Moto DROID Turbo 2 has surprisingly good camera according to DxOMark

Yesterday, during the announcement, Motorola claimed its new DROID Turbo 2 has a fantastic camera. While we’re skeptical to take the manufacturer’s own word for it, DxOMark seemingly agrees. Having put the Turbo 2’s snapper through its paces, DxO awarded it with 84 points, putting it in joint third position with the Nexus 6P. In short: Motorola finally made a good camera.

Breaking it down, the Turbo 2’s still photos were similar to those on the LG G4, Xperia Z3+ and Galaxy Note 4, but its videos were surpassed only by the Xperia Z5. DxO notes that its images in good light are fantastic. Its autofocusing is exemplary, as is its exposure, contrast and color control. In lower light conditions, its performance drops a little (as you’d expect) and, while white balance is generally good, it does apparently have the tendency to make whites look a little pink at times.

It’s a similar story with video too. It’s great all-round when shooting in good light. It tracks objects and focuses well. But in lower light, it struggles with autofocus and noise a little. On the plus side, it’s good at adapting when light levels and scenes suddenly change.

All in all, it seems we may finally have Motorola phones on the market which don’t force you to compromise on the camera to gain the rest of its selling points. It may not be the best camera on the market, but it’s nothing like as bad as previous generations.

dxomark Stories October 14, 2015

iPhone 6s camera outperformed by Nexus 6P, Moto X Style and Xperia Z5 in DxOMark rankings

DxOMark recently published its review of the iPhone 6s, and it confirms what we already sort-of new: it’s not a huge step up from the last generation iPhones. In fact, the camera performs ever-so-slightly worse than last year’s iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, which both entered the DxOMark rankings in 1st place when they were reviewed last year. Both iPhone cameras now sit 10th on the list, and have a number of Android phones ahead of them.

With Apple packing in more pixels in to the sensor, the company’s aim was to offer higher resolution pictures without ruining performance. For the most part, Apple achieved its goal. DxOMark notes that exposure, white balance and detail are all good in bright light. What’s more, autofocus and stabilization are both great on video in daylight.

It’s in low light conditions that the iPhone 6s doesn’t perform as well. There’s noticeable noise, yellowing and ghosting in low light and indoor conditions. Still, it’s outperformed by the likes of the new Huawei Nexus 6P and Moto X Style, both of which are much cheaper than Apple’s flagship.

DxOMark noted:

From our tests, images are generally well-exposed and for the most part colors are vivid and pleasing outdoors. However, there are occasional differences in exposure noticeable between consecutive captures in very bright outdoor scenes, typically due to the inconsistent activation of the HDR mode. There is also a slight but consistent underexposure in extremely low light levels (5 lux); the result however is still quite usable and an improvement over the iPhone 6.  White balance is reliable though inevitably some inaccuracies were noticeable at times, with a slight yellow cast visible in some outdoor scenes. Although this cast was present in captures from the iPhone 6 the cast was slightly stronger and more noticeable on the 6s.

As for video, it could do with some OIS action if it’s going to improve its stabilization in low light, which is currently supplied using some clever software tricks, rather than through mechanical means:

Results for digital stabilization were similar to the iPhone 6 (and the Samsung), with it working well in good lighting but rather less efficient at reducing shake in low light where, arguably, it is needed more.

Although the iPhone camera isn’t terrible by any means, there are a number of other handsets to choose from when looking for a great mobile snapper. Currently the Xperia Z5, S6 Edge and Nexus 6P occupy the first three places on the rankings. It’s also worth noting that the Galaxy Note 5, which many regard as having the best camera still hasn’t been ranked by the respected camera-testers at DxOMark. If/when that’s been reviewed, it’s likely the iPhone will have yet another Android phone ahead of it.

The days of Android fans having to put up with an average camera experience are long gone it seems.

dxomark Stories September 30, 2015

Nexus 6P camera among the best, according to DxOMark

Google wasn’t shy about telling us how great it thinks its new Nexus cameras are in its product unveiling yesterday. Both the new Nexus 5X and 6P use a 12.3MP Sony sensor with pixels so big, they didn’t need to add OIS. And while we should take Google’s word with a pinch of salt, the camera testers over at DxOMark pretty much agree with them…

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