Web browser Stories August 28, 2015

GOOG: 630.38

-7.23

Google Chrome to begin pausing Flash ads around the web on September 1st

Adobe Flash is notoriously both resource intensive and ubiquitous on the web, which hasn’t helped the open web survive in the consumer shift to mobile devices that have smaller screens and processors. Flash isn’t even supported in most mobile environments anymore because of its poor performance. Google is as a result working hard to eliminate Flash content from its ad network and create a better web browsing experience. Today it announced September 1st is when it will begin pausing many of the Flash ads seen around the web for users of its Chrome web browser.

Fortunately for Google, it’s able to convert most of the Flash ads uploaded to its AdWords advertiser network to the less intensive HTML5 automatically. The company provides a section on its support site where advertisers can go to see what Flash ads are eligible for this conversion, and it has even made a step-by-step tool for converting ads which can’t be automatically converted or haven’t already been uploaded to Google’s servers.

Google first announced this shift back in June, and while the company has its own mobile operating system with a massive amount of native apps in the form of Android, it’s still a big proponent of the web. Perhaps because that’s where it was born, but really because the web isn’t closed off like mobile operating systems, and the underlying hypertext language of the web allows the company to easily scrape and index it for its Search business, among other things. The company introduced a setting to its Chrome browser in March which enables this disabling of Flash plugin content. Chrome for Android and iOS doesn’t support it at all.

Web browser Stories May 22, 2015

Launched in September 2008, Google’s Chrome browser is now dominant in its share of the desktop web browser market, with approximately 1 in 4 Internet users interfacing with the web using the browser. What many Chrome users probably don’t know, however, is that it’s actually based off the open source Chromium browser, also developed by Google. Up until today Chrome for Android differed from its desktop counterpart in that it’s codebase wasn’t open source – meaning, the code for the app wasn’t publicly available for other developers to view, modify, and build upon. That changed today.

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Web browser Stories June 10, 2014

Google appears to be rethinking its “Origin Chip” initiative that would hide complete URLs when browsing the web from Chrome. Recently, Chrome team member Peter Kasting referred to the address cropping feature as a low priority, saying “”the origin chip work is backburnered” on an issue tracking website. Under the Origin Chip, Chrome’s search bar would only display a website’s domain name, opposed to its full URL. The idea was to make web browsing less distracting.

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Everyone can use an Echo Dot: Just $50!

Web browser Stories April 30, 2014

new-incognito

Google may be hard at work retooling the look and feel of Android, but the company isn’t stoping there. Chrome appears to be in for a few cosmetic tweaks and the company is starting this effort with a new Incognito tab page. Pictured above is a screenshot of how the private browsing tab will look in the near future. If you’re unfamiliar with Incognito mode, it’s Chrome’s privacy tab that lets users browse the web without logging in their history.

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Web browser Stories December 20, 2013

Google’s Chromium Blog just announced intentions of the search engine giant to knock out toolbars and “multipurpose extensions” out of the Chrome Web Store. The update to the policy is basically summed up as: “extensions in the Chrome Web Store must have a single purpose that is narrow and easy-to-understand.” That sounds simple enough, no?

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Web browser Stories October 31, 2013

Google added automatic malware blocking to latest ‘Canary’ build of Chrome

Google has added automatic blocking of malware from the latest ‘Canary‘ build of its Chrome browser.

Bad guys trick you into installing and running this kind of software by bundling it with something you might want, like a free screensaver, a video plugin or—ironically—a supposed security update. These malicious programs disguise themselves so you won’t know they’re there and they may change your homepage or inject ads into the sites you browse […]

In the current Canary build of Chrome, we’ll automatically block downloads of malware that we detect.

Confusingly, Google has four versions of its Chrome browser available at any one time: the official, public release; a developer version; a beta version, for those who want early access to new features; and Canary. Canary is essentially a beta version that installs as a second browser, so you can use that most of the time and fall back to the official version if something doesn’t work.

While not all Canary features make it into the official build, this one seems likely to – and would make Chrome the ideal browser to recommend to any of your less-techy family and friends who cheerfully download anything and everything, usually identifiable by the fact that the top half of their browser window comprises half a dozen different toolbars …

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