Chromium Stories November 19, 2021

Chromium repository used by browser developers accidentally contained test malware, Chrome users not impacted

Google this afternoon alerted Chromium developers about the possibility that they were exposed to malware used for testing due to an internal “oversight.”

Chromium Stories April 27, 2021

With the underlying concept popularized by Stadia and other game services, Mighty wants to stream an entire Chromium browser from the cloud. The effort emerged this week after two years of development with a tagline of “Make Chrome Faster.”

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Chromium Stories March 8, 2021

The latest Alpha update for Xbox One and Series consoles updates the Microsoft Edge browser to the more recent version based on Google’s Chromium, and players have already found a way to run Stadia.

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Chromium Stories January 15, 2021

Besides the intended differences, web browsers based on Chromium offer an underlying experience that’s mostly identical to Chrome. Google recently discovered that users of third-party Chromium browsers have inadvertently been able to access data and other sync features reserved for Chrome.

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Chromium Stories August 18, 2020

Microsoft pulls the plug on original Edge browser next year after replacing w/ Chromium version

After debuting its faster, better Chromium-based Edge earlier this year, Microsoft has announced that the legacy version of Edge is going away next year.

Chromium Stories June 12, 2020

Over the past few weeks, protesters around the world have spoken out against all forms of racism and to proudly declare that Black Lives Matter. Google has been a supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement and the protests, and now the Chrome team is beginning to eliminate even subtle forms of racism by moving away from terms like “blacklist” and “whitelist.”

Update: Google’s Android team is now implementing a similar effort to replace the words “blacklist” and “whitelist.”

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Chromium Stories June 3, 2020

Microsoft Edge was originally just a replacement for Internet Explorer, but to truly start competing in the browser space, Microsoft threw out the backend and rebuilt Edge on top of Chromium. Now, months after its wide release, Microsoft’s Chromium Edge is rolling out to all Windows 10 users.

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Chromium Stories May 30, 2020

Right now, the only way to use Chrome extensions on Android is to use an alternative browser like Kiwi Browser, which is based on the same Chromium browser engine. The developer responsible for Kiwi Browser is working with Google and Samsung to bring Kiwi’s extensions support “upstream” to Chromium for other Chromium-based browsers to use freely.

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Chromium Stories May 19, 2020

Microsoft Edge went from a replacement for the often-mocked Internet Explorer to the world’s second-most-popular desktop browser. How? Microsoft switched to Chromium. Now, as part of Build 2020, Microsoft Edge is getting a handful of big updates including extension sync, sidebar search, and more.

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Chromium Stories February 26, 2020

Microsoft rolling out its new Chromium-based Edge via Windows 10 Insider update

Microsoft’s new Edge is based on Chromium and gives Google Chrome a run for its money in a few ways. Now Microsoft is starting to replace the old Edge with the new via Windows 10’s update system.

Chromium Stories January 15, 2020

Microsoft Edge, the web browser that replaced Internet Explorer with the release of Windows 10, has been given a dramatic overhaul in the last year or so to be rebuilt on the same Chromium source code that Google Chrome is based on. Today, the new version of Microsoft Edge, based on Google’s Chromium, has been officially launched on Windows and macOS.

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Chromium Stories December 27, 2019

Today, the rumor going around is that Apple might be rebuilding their storied macOS browser Safari on top of Google’s Chromium, similar to Microsoft’s recent changes to Edge. However, the “evidence” for this just doesn’t add up.

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Chromium Stories June 20, 2019

Microsoft’s Chromium Edge browser comes to Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1

After only initially being available on Windows 10, Microsoft’s Chromium Edge browser is now available to those using Windows 7 and Windows 8.

Chromium Stories May 20, 2019

Microsoft’s Chromium-based Edge now available to try on macOS

Since late last year, we’ve been following the development of Microsoft’s attempt to start fresh and do things better with their Edge browser by rebuilding it based on Google’s Chromium (the foundation of Google Chrome). One of the exciting prospects to come out of that development is that Edge would be available on non-Windows platforms. As of today, the new, Chromium-based Microsoft Edge is ready to try out on macOS.

Chromium Stories April 15, 2019

Microsoft’s Chromium-based Edge browser quietly adds Google to search providers, native Translator coming soon

Microsoft’s brand new Chromium-based Edge browser might finally gain some ground in the battle to remain relevant in the web search space. The problem is that Microsoft seems to be cherry-picking features to remove, much to the disappointment of users.

Chromium Stories April 9, 2019

Microsoft’s Chromium-based Edge browser disables 51 Google services, will eventually support 32-bit Win 10

While Microsoft finally embracing Chromium is a massive deal, it is being particularly picky about what tools and features come with Edge. The company has 51 of Google services turned off as standard in its build of Chromium.

Chromium Stories April 8, 2019

Over the past few months, we’ve been following Microsoft’s plan to replace their Edge browser on Windows 10 with a browser based on Chromium, Google’s open-source base for Chrome. As of today, Microsoft has made the new Chromium-based Edge available to download for public testing.

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Chromium Stories March 24, 2019

Late last year, Microsoft confirmed the rumors that they were rebuilding their Edge browser, using open source tech from Chrome like the Blink engine instead of EdgeHTML. This weekend, new screenshots of the Chromium-based Edge (sometimes lovingly called Edgium) have leaked out, giving us a clear picture of Microsoft’s ambitions for the browser.

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Chromium Stories September 30, 2016

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One of the main concerns around using Google’s “free” services and applications is that the company tracks and uses people’s data to better serve them ads. This is especially true for anyone who wants to protect their privacy and doesn’t want their data sent all over the internet. Thankfully, a developer on Github has created ungoogled-chromium — Chrome without the built-in Google services…

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Chromium Stories February 17, 2016

neverware

Neverware makes Chromium OS, the open-source version of Chrome OS, easy to install on any PC or Mac. Unsurprisingly, it has gained traction with budget-strapped schools that have aging laptops laying around. While schools have to pay a license fee, it is free to download for everyone else and an update today adds a new dual-booting capability.

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Chromium Stories August 3, 2015

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Chrome Beta version 45 for Android is rolling out today (Play Store link) and includes some nice interface tweaks as well as one addition that was previously announced at Google’s I/O developer conference back in May. Chrome Beta is a build of the Chrome browser which includes features and changes that are almost, but not quite, ready for use by the masses. Showing up in the Beta build of the browser is a good indicator that a feature or adjustment will soon reach those masses, so it’s always interesting to see what’s been added.

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Chromium Stories July 21, 2015

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As we reported back in late June, the Chromium team – which creates a public, open-source browser that was forked to create the popular Chrome browser from Google, and who’s updates are regularly merged into Chrome – is working hard on a “Reader Mode” for the Android version of the browser. This mode would recognize articles and pages with lots of text, display a “Make page mobile-friendly” button and, when tapped, strip a page of all extraneous content, leaving just the page’s body text, title, and images. The feature is getting ever-closer to completion, so we’re taking another look at what has changed recently.

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Chromium Stories July 11, 2015

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Do you speak and write in more than one language – and often use them interchangeably? If so, you may know the frustration of having to constantly change the language Google Chrome uses for spellchecking. Fortunately, it looks like Chrome soon will be able to spellcheck in multiple languages simultaneously, as well as make it easy to quickly toggle spellchecking on and off for different languages.

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Chromium Stories July 7, 2015

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Longtime users of Google Chrome may remember a period when it was possible to display tabs vertically, in a bar on the left-hand side of the screen, rather than at the top above the address bar. That feature (pictured above) was experimental, and the Chromium team, which creates public forks of the source code behind Google’s commercial browser, eventually gave up on the idea because it was believed to be a niche feature and “nobody stepped forward to do the work to drive the feature to completion.” Sidebars may be coming back from the dead in a different but similar form, however…

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Chromium Stories June 30, 2015

Chrome for Android soon may show you alt-text when you long-press images

The Android version of Google’s Chrome browser has a neat new feature in it, if you’re willing to use a beta build of the mobile browser.

Now when you long-press on an image in the browser, a new menu will appear which includes the alt-text of the image in question. Alt-text, or alternative text, is a way to describe what an image is of in the HTML of the webpage. This is particularly helpful for those with vision impairments, as screen readers which can read webpages out loud are able to tell them what images on the pages they visit are depicting when alt-text is attached.

This new feature, shared on Google+ by none other than Chrome evangelist François Beaufort, could be useful, for example, when viewing any images with writing on them that have been scanned and posted online, where the text on them may be hard to read. Including what they say in the alt-text would make reading old texts easier. Chrome Beta for Android can be downloaded from Google Play.

Chromium Stories June 22, 2015

Ok-Google-Voice-Search

Update: What’s that? Oh, just the smell of change. After initially standing firm on its implementation of the hotwording module and proprietary Google extension being automatically downloaded in new installations of the Chromium open source browser, a wave of criticism has led to the team pulling it out of Chromium 45 and onwards. The module that manages whether the hotword listening extension is enabled will be “disabled by default” and the proprietary technology that actually listens for “Ok Google” will not download. A member of the team says simply:

In light of this issue, we have decided to remove the hotwording component entirely from Chromium. As it is not open source, it does not belong in the open source browser.

The original story continues below.

It all started with a blinking LED light. Ofer Zelig wrote on his blog today about an odd case where the LED light on his computer, that turns on whenever the microphone or camera is activated, seemed to blink every few seconds or so while he was working on his PC. He investigated in the Windows Task Manager to look for any process that might be to blame – no dice. He shut down some suspicious processes that might have been causing it and says he didn’t have any malware installed, but still to no avail. Turns out, the culprit was none other than Google’s Chrome browser…

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Chromium Stories June 18, 2015

Chrome’s Easter egg t-rex game just got harder with the introduction of pterodactyls

Have you come across the Easter egg in Google Chrome that alleviates the frustration of your Internet going down with a fun side-scrolling game? You’re a dinosaur running and your objective is to jump and avoid hitting obstacles like rocks, ditches, and cacti, getting the highest score you can in order show off and brag to your friends (or earn their pity on you). Recently, that game has become a bit more difficult with the introduction of a new obstacle — a dinosaur that can fly.

Chrome evangelist François Beaufort posted to his Google+ account yesterday to show off what the new dinosaur, a pterodactyl, looks like in action in the game, saying it was added in a recent update to Chromium. You won’t face off against the dinosaur until your score nears 500 and, to be honest, I was having trouble reaching that score so I just used the image he shared, pictured above.

If you haven’t seen this Easter egg in Chrome before, next time you try and load a website in Chrome and get the “Unable to connect to the Internet” page, click on the dinosaur and then press either the <Up> or <Left> key on your keyboard and the game will begin. Or you can just disable the Internet connection on your computer and try to refresh a page.

Chromium Stories June 16, 2015

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If you’ve been following the latest with Chrome for Android, you probably know that Google has been making a big push with web apps. In Chrome for Android beta 42, Google added banners that recommend users install web apps to their home screens, and in beta version 43, the Chrome for Android app now has banners that push native apps on users as well. Now, in the latest build of the Chromium—the open source project that is the basis for Chrome—browser, Google is testing banners suggesting that users add sites to their app shelf. expand full story

Chromium Stories June 12, 2015

Chrome Web Store adds new device compatibility indicator

 

It’s Friday! As the week draws to a close, we’ve shared some interesting little additions to the Play Store including new user feedback call-to-actions and a ‘Free App of the Week‘ promotion, and so it only makes sense to mention a change to the Chrome Web Store that happened this week: there’s a new device compatibility icon.

Yes, not a huge change, but helpful nonetheless. If an extension or theme is compatible with your device, you’ll see a reassuring “Compatible with your device” indicator in the right-hand information rail, above the app description. If not, you’ll (as always) see the “Add to Chrome” button replaced by a red “Not Compatible” button, like the one pictured below. That picture was taken from techdows.com because it’s surprisingly hard to find a Chrome Web Store app not compatible with any of my computers, but what the picture below is showing is Chrome disabling NPAPI plugins on Windows 8, as the technology is not compatible with Windows 8 Metro mode.

This change was initially spotted by a tipster speaking with the unofficial Chrome Operating System blog.

Chromium Stories March 13, 2015

Google released Chrome 42 this week through its beta channel for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome OS. The latest Chrome beta previews a couple of interesting features that make web apps more like native apps including push notifications and saving web apps to your Android home screen faster… expand full story

Chromium Stories February 13, 2015

Google launches Android WebView beta channel for developers

Google today announced that it’s launching a beta channel or Android WebView, the API many apps use to display webpages. Google noted that with Android 5.0 Lollipop, it now “has the ability to update WebView independently.” It will begin to allow developers to use the new beta channel for testing the latest updates to WebView starting today:

WebView updates bring numerous bug fixes, new web platform APIs and updates from Chromium. If you’re making use of the WebView in your app, becoming a beta channel tester will give you an early start with new APIs as well as the chance to test your app before the WebView rolls out to your users.

Developers interested in becoming beta testers can join the community here in order to sign up for the program and install the WebView beta from Google Play.

Chromium Stories July 17, 2014

Google seeds Chrome 37 beta with DirectWrite support on Windows

Google announced on Thursday afternoon that it has released Chrome 37 beta with a number of new developer features, making it easier to create richer and faster web content and apps. The beta release includes support for the DirectWrite API on Windows for high-quality text rendering, even on high DPI displays.

The release also adds an HTML element called <dialog> as one of its headline features, allowing for styled boxes that can be controlled with JavaScript. More than a half-dozen other improvements were also made.

The full changelog from the Chromium blog:

Other updates in this release

  • The Web Cryptography JavaScript API is enabled by default starting in Chrome 37, allowing developers to perform cryptographic operations such as hashing, signature generation/verification, and encryption.
  • Subpixel font scaling is now supported, which enables smooth animations of text between font sizes.
  • TouchEvents are now longs instead of integers, enabling higher-fidelity touch interactions on high-DPI displays.
  • CSS cursor values “zoom-in” and “zoom-out” are now unprefixed.
  • The number of cores on a physical machine can now be accessed bynavigator.hardwareConcurrency.
  • The user’s preferred languages are now accessible by navigator.languages, and the languagechange event is fired when this is updated.
  • The CSS Shapes Module allows developers to define non-rectangular text wrapping boundaries around floated elements.
  • NPAPI deprecation continues according to our previously-announced plan with a harder-to-bypass blocking UI.
  • The default monospace font on Windows is now Consolas instead of Courier New.

Chromium Stories May 13, 2014

red nexus 5

Coming roughly a week after the Nexus 8’s “Flounder” codename was shown off in Chromium’s source code, we now have a reference to the “Nexus 6” (via Florian Kiersch).

The Nexus 6 reference can still be seen on the Code Review page, under the new code section. There is also a reference to the Nexus 8 in the older code. The Nexus 8 is expected to be produced by HTC, as earlier leaks have suggested. The “8” is also likely a reference to the screen size, which would make the Nexus 8 larger than the ASUS-produced Nexus 7. Beyond this, very little is known about the specifications or ETA of the Nexus 8.

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Chromium Stories January 23, 2014

‘Ok Google’ voice search arrives as native Chromium feature without browser extension

Google’s open-source Chromium evangelist François Beaufort shared some interesting details today about new voice search integration in the latest Chromium build— Google’s open source browser project that is often used to develop and test features coming soon to its Chrome browser. While users have been able to download a browser extension for Chrome since November that allows them to activate a voice search with the “Ok Google” voice command (just like on Android), it appears Google is testing the command as a native feature without the need of the extension. Beaufort notes that the latest Chromium code shows the ability to toggle the feature through settings:

Chromium Stories January 16, 2014

Google developing “Chromoting” remote desktop management app for iOS

Google been working on a remote desktop management app for Android devices called “Chromoting” since last year, but today an entry in the Chromium issue tracker has revealed that an iOS version is also under developement. The issue, which was opened on Wednesday, indicates that the iOS version is still very much in the design stage, while its counterpart on Android is much further along in its development.

According to the post, the iOS version is is expected to be released much later than the Android client. The features of the app have mostly been kept under wraps, but it looks like a fairly straightforward piece of software that allows you to access and manipulate remote machines using Chrome as a condiut for the connection. The biggest advantage Chromoting would have over similiar solutions would be the low, low price of $0.00.

Chromium Stories December 20, 2013

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Google’s Chromium Blog just announced intentions of the search engine giant to knock out toolbars and “multipurpose extensions” out of the Chrome Web Store. The update to the policy is basically summed up as: “extensions in the Chrome Web Store must have a single purpose that is narrow and easy-to-understand.” That sounds simple enough, no?

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Chromium Stories December 4, 2013

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Google began tightening saved password security in Chrome for Mac almost one month ago. Now, it looks like Windows users will soon be able to join in on the fun. For the second time today, Google’s “Happiness Evangelist” Francois Beaufort is breaking the news. According to Beaufort, the “Reauthentication dialog for passwords” has been added into Chromium and is now ported over to Windows in the latest Chromium build.

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Chromium Stories October 3, 2013

Chrome 31 Beta released with shortcuts for web apps on Android & more

Google today announced the release of Chrome Beta 31 for Android and desktop that includes new web app shortcuts on Android, an improved auto complete experience for payments, and much more.

The new application shortcuts for Chrome for Android allows you to add a shortcut to a webpage to your Android home screen. While you could already save a similar type of shortcut on Android, Google is now giving the sites an option to open in a special fullscreen mode without all the browser controls:

Sites launched in this way will open in a normal Chrome for Android window, unless they include themobile-web-app-capable meta tag. Those sites will instead open in a special fullscreen Chrome for Android window that doesn’t display tabs, buttons, menus, or the Omnibox. Try adding a shortcut to weight.aerotwist.com to see this in action.

Chrome 31 also includes a smoother experience for autocomplete on Android, Windows, and Chrome OS (soon on Mac) that makes it easier to fill out forms online starting first with payments:

requestAutocomplete() makes it easier for users to fill out online forms by offering web developers programmatic access to the browser’s autocomplete information (with the user’s explicit permission). For this first release, we’ve made it work for web payments. On sites with requestAutocomplete(), users will be able to either use their existing payment data stored with the browser or enter new details through a browser-provided interface. As a developer, you can continue processing payments with your existing payment processor.

The release has a ton of other new features and improvements including new Chrome Apps APIs, the ability for developers to execute native code with Portable Native Client (PNaCl), Speech recognition with the JavaScript Web Speech API, and much more. A full list of what’s new is available on the Chromium blog.

Chromium Stories August 13, 2013

Google increases bug bounties up to fivefold after paying out $2M to date

Google is increasing the bounty it pays to security researchers who discover and report bugs in Chromium by up to 500 percent after announcing that it has paid out a combined total of $2M in bug bounties across Chromium and Google-owned websites in just three years.

Today, the Chromium program is raising reward levels significantly. In a nutshell, bugs previously rewarded at the $1,000 level will now be considered for reward at up to $5,000. In many cases, this will be a 5x increase in reward level! We’ll issue higher rewards for bugs we believe present a more significant threat to user safety, and when the researcher provides an accurate analysis of exploitability and severity. We will continue to pay previously announced bonuses on top, such as those for providing a patch or finding an issue in a critical piece of open source software.

This follows earlier similar increases for reporting website vulnerabilities back in June.

Although the sums of money offered for reporting vulnerabilities are substantially lower than could be made by selling the info on the black market to those who would use it for nefarious reasons, the thinking behind bug bounties is it encourages those who would never dream of misusing the info to file prompt reports. Many large tech companies offer bug bounties, with Microsoft – a long-time hold-out – joining in a month ago.

Chromium Stories July 2, 2013

stash

Back in May, Opera released a ‘sneak peak’ of its latest browser, Opera 15. The big selling point behind it was the engine under the hood. For the first time ever, the browser was powered by Chromium rather than Opera’s classic Presto engine. Today, the company has officially released the browser for both Mac and Windows in its final state to the public.

The new Opera for Windows and Mac runs on a Chromium engine, so you can access all your websites in a blink of an eye and have a smoother experience when you get there, thanks to improved site compatibility.

The latest version of  Opera includes a host of new features in addition to the new Chromium engine. For one, the Speed Dial homepage has been refreshed with the ability to create folders and more. A new ‘Stash’ feature lets you collect snapshots of saved webpages in one place and go back and reference them if needed. The new Discover feature automatically shows you the top articles from locations and categories you choose. Finally, Opera says that the browser should perform better on slow connections thanks to the new ‘Off-road’ mode. expand full story

Chromium Stories May 28, 2013

Opera has released what it describes as a ‘sneak preview’ of its latest browser, Opera 15, available for both Windows and Mac. As we reported last month, it is powered by Chromium rather than the Presto engine Opera had used for earlier versions.

While Opera is still a significant player in the mobile market, it has fallen out of favour in the desktop market, with a market share of just a few percent, well behind Chrome, IE, Firefox and Safari. Version 15 introduces a couple of new features that Opera hopes may change that … expand full story

Chromium Stories May 7, 2013

Last month we saw hints that Google Now could be coming to the web, and now it looks like we could see deeper integration than we thought.

François Beaufort points us to Notification Center pop-ups being developed in a recent Chromium build, much like the Gmail notifications offered by its web app.

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Chromium Stories December 12, 2012

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The Chrome team has announced a new addition to the Chromium (beta version of Chrome) browser this afternoon, changing the way many users will search for content online via Google and other search engines. Google is testing/experimenting with an added search box to the new tab page, a page that has historically just listed recently viewed websites, and the new search box will not only include Google search but will also be accompanied by Yahoo, Bing and others. Google said the reasoning behind the change is: “we’ve found that many people still navigate to their search engine’s home page to initiate a search instead.”

Google is also allowing search engines to display what a user has searched for right in the omnibox, potentially doing away with a second search box on the actual search page. Additionally, Google has made a new Embedded Search API available so other search engines can implement what’s new. The features outlined today are available for testing from the Chrome Developer Channel that includes a select few Chrome OS and Windows users (Mac will be coming soon). Sadly, Mountain View gave no word on when the features will hit an official build.

Source: Chromium Blog

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Chromium Stories September 24, 2011

From some slides of an internal presentation given by Google, it appears that where there is now Google Docs, there will soon be ‘Google Drive’.  Most of the functionality, like uploading files of any type, of the mythical Google Drive now lies in Docs Hopefully, with this upcoming rebrand, Google allows more storage (let me buy it) and also has some utilities like backing up the home folder on Windows or Mac.  Seriously, what better way to get users to adopt your system than to offer to sych your files to the cloud.

Oh, now that we have all of your files, you might as well get a Chomebook.

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Chromium Stories August 23, 2011

When we think of Google and browsers we usually think of the latest Chrome build, the fastest real world use desktop browser around. While the browser currently shipping on Android is nothing to sneeze at, Google’s real innovation in the browser space is arguably happening with Chrome. That’s why it’s surprising we haven’t heard more about a potential port of Chrome to Android, a project the Android team is now actively working on with the open source WebKit community.

Googler Andrei Popescu, along with a couple others working on the project, took to WeKit-Dev group today (via TechCrunch) to announce their focus on the port:

We would like to give an update about WebKit on Android. A while ago, we started the effort to upstream the Android port of WebKit. For a variety of reasons, this work took longer than anticipated and was never finished. We realize that the incomplete Android port that exists today in WebKit ToT has caused quite a bit of confusion and inconvenience to the project as a whole and we are very sorry for that.

In case you’re confused, the browser currently running on Android was originally based on the WeKit layout engine and Chrome’s V8 Javascript engine, but also varies from the desktop version of Chrome enough that two separate teams work on the two browsers. expand full story

Chromium Stories June 10, 2011

As if there has ever been any doubt that Chrome OS would eventually run on tablets, developer François Beaufort has discovered a number of touch-related tweaks in the latest Chromium browser build. And because enhancements from the Chromium project usually trickle down to the Chrome browser and Chrome OS, it is very likely that Google is accelerating tablet plans – especially with Microsoft’s Windows 8 now in the picture. “I compiled Touch UI version of Chromium to see how it looked like”, Beaufort wrote in a Google Buzz post. As you can see from the screenshots (two more below the fold), the Chrome interface has been optimized for touch-based input…

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