Get a free $10 Amazon gift card when you buy a Chromecast for $30 Prime shipped

From 9to5Toys.com:
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Amazon is throwing in a free $10 gift card with the purchase of a Google Chromecast HDMI Streaming Media Player for $29.99 Prime shipped. This combo carries a street value of $45 since the Chromecast usually sells for $35 by itself. Assuming you use the credit, today’s deal nets you the best HDMI streaming player for an effective price of just $20. Prime members (free trial) receive free 2-day shipping, while all other buyers will need to spend $35 or more to lock-in free standard shipping. To qualify for this deal you’ll need to add the Chromecast and $10 gift card to your cart via this promo page.

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Chromecast streams Netflix, YouTube, HBO Go, Hulu Plus and tons of other apps to your TV over Wi-Fi using your iOS/Android device or laptop. Get even more value out of your Chromecast by taking advantage of special offers like a free Google Play movie rental. It’s rated 4.1 out of 5 stars from 35,264 Amazon reviewers.

Other retailers are also discounting Chromecast: Buy two and save $15 at Google Play or Best Buy, $20 for refurbished at Groupon. Read more

Chrome Beta 45 introduces improved media playback controls, timed install banners to Android version

 

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As the Google Chrome web browser and web-based Chrome OS operating system continue on their ever quickening path towards divergence and feature parity with the native Android smartphone operating system, all of which are overseen by Google CEO Larry Page’s number two, Sundar Pichai, Chrome for Android is getting some new functionality that brings it closer to what developers can get out of native apps.

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Touchscreen + Chrome OS: Do they work together? [Video]

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Acer did something a little unusual last month when it announced an all-in-one Chromebase desktop with a touchscreen. It’s the first of its kind, and the company hopes it can bring something unique to the market. I’ve been testing it for the past week and, although it’s clearly not an input replacement for the mouse and keyboard, it actually has its uses.

The entire 21.5-inch 1080p panel has a layer of touch sensors over the top of it. It’s ten-point multitouch, and can be used to do all manner of things. It’s mostly intuitive too. There’s little unusual or unfamiliar if you’ve been using touchscreen smartphones for any length of time. Read more

Want your Gmail messages to self-destruct? There’s a Chrome extension for that…

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Dmail is a Chrome extension which allows you to un-send, or revoke any emails you send through your Gmail account. The service was launched by the same brainiacs that brought us the Delicious social bookmarking tool.

Self-destructing email isn’t exactly a new thing. Google itself rolled out a feature that lets you un-send a message once you’ve sent it. The only issue with Google’s built-in service however, is that you only have 30 seconds to change your mind about sending an email to someone. Dmail lets you revoke emails whenever you like. I took it for a quick spin to see what it’s like, and I have to say, it’s an incredibly convenient way to make all your outgoing communication more secure. It also happens to be ridiculously easy to use.

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Acer Chromebase Touch: Unboxing the all-in-one Chrome OS touchscreen desktop [Video]

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Acer recently unveiled a new range of all-in-one desktop computers running Chrome OS. The Acer Chromebase Touch is one of the company’s most recent models, and it has a 21.5-inch, full HD touchscreen. It’s powered by a Tegra K1 quad-core processor, 4 GB RAM, 16 GB of storage and a couple of 3W front-firing speakers.

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Google’s ‘Safe Browsing’ alerts to become more prominent as deceptive software detection improves

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If you’ve ever been browsing the web and seen the above warning, you’ve probably done one of two things. You either quickly click the “Back to safety” button, or you navigate into the “Details” section to tell Chrome that it’s being a helicopter mom — and go about your “dangerous” browsing. Although I haven’t encountered this page too many times, I definitely fall into the latter category when I do.

Today, Google announced that as its detection of unwanted software on the web has improved, these alerts are going to become more common in your web browsing experience. Specifically, in the coming weeks, you’ll see “more warnings than ever before”… Read more

Good news: Chrome may soon get simultaneous multilingual spellchecking

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Do you speak and write in more than one language – and often use them interchangeably? If so, you may know the frustration of having to constantly change the language Google Chrome uses for spellchecking. Fortunately, it looks like Chrome soon will be able to spellcheck in multiple languages simultaneously, as well as make it easy to quickly toggle spellchecking on and off for different languages.

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Chromium contributors developing a ‘Sidebar API,’ could be used to resurrect Side Tabs feature

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Longtime users of Google Chrome may remember a period when it was possible to display tabs vertically, in a bar on the left-hand side of the screen, rather than at the top above the address bar. That feature (pictured above) was experimental, and the Chromium team, which creates public forks of the source code behind Google’s commercial browser, eventually gave up on the idea because it was believed to be a niche feature and “nobody stepped forward to do the work to drive the feature to completion.” Sidebars may be coming back from the dead in a different but similar form, however…

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Chrome ‘OK Google’ hotwording extension sparks new privacy concerns, confusion (Update: Chromium team backpeddals)

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Update: What’s that? Oh, just the smell of change. After initially standing firm on its implementation of the hotwording module and proprietary Google extension being automatically downloaded in new installations of the Chromium open source browser, a wave of criticism has led to the team pulling it out of Chromium 45 and onwards. The module that manages whether the hotword listening extension is enabled will be “disabled by default” and the proprietary technology that actually listens for “Ok Google” will not download. A member of the team says simply:

In light of this issue, we have decided to remove the hotwording component entirely from Chromium. As it is not open source, it does not belong in the open source browser.

The original story continues below.

It all started with a blinking LED light. Ofer Zelig wrote on his blog today about an odd case where the LED light on his computer, that turns on whenever the microphone or camera is activated, seemed to blink every few seconds or so while he was working on his PC. He investigated in the Windows Task Manager to look for any process that might be to blame – no dice. He shut down some suspicious processes that might have been causing it and says he didn’t have any malware installed, but still to no avail. Turns out, the culprit was none other than Google’s Chrome browser…

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Acer launches Chromebase with optional touch display for $329/$429 in US

Acer Chromebase Front Facing Left

First announced in April, Acer is today officially launching its Chromebase all-in-one (DC221HQ) for customers in the US. Two models are available, one with a touch display for $429 and another without the touch display for $329.   

Specs for both models include a 21.5-inch 1080p HD display, NVIDIA Tegra K1 quad-core processor, 4GB RAM, 16GB SSD, a built-in webcam, a stand that tilts 15 to 75 degrees and offers VESA mount compatibility, and, of course, Chrome OS. You’ll also find the usual USB 3.0 and 2.0 ports, Bluetooth, and WiFi offerings.

The non-touch screen version of the new Acer Chromebase is available through retailers this month for $329, while the multi-touch model will ship next months or $429.

More images and the full press release is below: Read more

Latest Chromium build tests prompting users to install web apps for sites they visit often

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If you’ve been following the latest with Chrome for Android, you probably know that Google has been making a big push with web apps. In Chrome for Android beta 42, Google added banners that recommend users install web apps to their home screens, and in beta version 43, the Chrome for Android app now has banners that push native apps on users as well. Now, in the latest build of the Chromium—the open source project that is the basis for Chrome—browser, Google is testing banners suggesting that users add sites to their app shelf. Read more