Comic-Con bans Google Glass from movie and TV panels

Google founder Sergey Brin poses for a portrait wearing Google Glass glasses before the Diane von Furstenberg  Spring/Summer 2013 collection show during New York Fashion Week

Although Google Glass is available to the public, it’s understandable that the wearable tech isn’t welcomed everywhere, however being barred from a convention full of nerds has a special kind of sting. Comic-Con is currently underway and while the San Diego Convention Center is packed to the gills with cosplayers, anyone dressed up as Google co-founders Sergey Brin or Larry Page better not be wearing Glass — at least not during the show’s video screening panels.

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Chris Dale, PR head of Google Glass, says it’s a ‘living experiment’ and that feedback trumps surprise

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Google Glass has had a mixed bag of reception, and it worries some that Google has made clear that it’s still more of an experiment while Android Wear devices have already gone on to be full-fledged products. And that’s probably because it’s simply not ready for the public, yet. The device’s roller coaster of good and bad press is definitely an example of this, but Tom’s Guide got a chance to sit down with Chris Dale, head of communications and public affairs for Google Glass, who says nothing we’ve seen is really a surprise.

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MindRDR demonstrates how thought alone could control Google Glass [Video]

eeg

It sounds like a pretty cool idea right there, but for those with medical conditions that don’t allow them to control Glass by voice or touch – such as those with locked-in syndrome – this could change their lives.

Engadget reports that UK company This Place has created the MindRDR app to enable a Glass user who’s also wearing a head-mounted EEG sensor to take a photo and upload it to Facebook or Twitter by pure thought control.

It’s essentially a proof of concept at this stage, with only one form of measurement: concentration.

MindRDR shows up as a thin white line on Glass’s screen, which moves upwards the more the user concentrates. Once that line reaches the very top, it snaps a picture of whatever you want – you simply need to repeat the process to upload the image to a social network …

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Former Glass head says Google’s wearable not the “definitive answer”

glass

Google X director and former head of Google Glass Babak Parviz said at the Wearable Technologies Conference that the company’s product is “one answer” but “not necessarily the definitive answer,” reports CNET.

Parviz, who last month stepped aside from leading the Glass team in favor of the more fashion-focused Ivy Ross, described the product as a first step in the right direction.

This is a nice first step to where we want to go. We can see glimmers of how this might work out …

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