New patent reveals another Samsung Google Glass clone

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According to a new patent application filed with the Korean Intellectual Property Office (via Galaxy Club), it looks like Samsung may be planning to take Google Glass head-on. While this isn’t the first time Samsung has filed a Glass-like patent, the application reveals what appears to be a cross between Google Glass and a Bluetooth headset. As odd as that may sound, there could be some practicality behind this idea.

As mentioned in the patent application, Samsung calls this device “Earphone,” but other rumors have suggested that this device could be called Gear Glass or Galaxy Glass. The patent doesn’t describe exactly what this device would be used for, but it looks like Google Glass may have some tough competition in the future.

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Google patent application details micro camera system for contact lenses of the future

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Google will soon open its Glass explorer program to all US residents for one day only, however a recent patent application from the search engine kingpin might make you reconsider making a purchase tomorrow. Spotted by the folks at Patent Bolt, Google has filed a patent application for a micro camera component to compliment its recently announced smart contact lenses.

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Google plans to let anyone in the US buy Glass for one day only on April 15 (Update: Confirmed)

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Update: Google has confirmed on Google+ that it does plan to open the Explorer program in the US for a period of time on April 15th.

Google has been slowly opening up its Google Glass Explorer Program to more people, but it’s about to let anyone in the US join the program and purchase Glass, at least for one day. TheVerge posted the document above showing what appears to be an upcoming Google Glass “Explorer Program Expansion,” or at least a proposal for one, that would see Google selling Glass for the usual $1500 through Google.com/glass to anyone in the US that wants one. That opposed to the waiting list that Google is currently taking sign ups for.  Read more

Google Glass being tested by U.S. Air Force for use on the battlefield

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We’ve seen Google Glass be adopted in places such as operating rooms, football fields, basketball courts, and by the New York City Police Department. But this latest use case pushes the boundaries of Glass to an entirely new level. According to a new report out of VentureBeat, the U.S. Air Force’s “BATMAN” research team is currently beta-testing the use of Glass on the battle field at its Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. 

According to the report, one of the things the research team likes the most is the ability for the device to “access information very quickly.” Other things the team is fond of “are its low power, its low footprint, it sits totally above the eyes, and doesn’t block images or hinder vision,”

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Google wants to trademark dat ‘Glass’

A visitor is testing the new Google Glasses at the international fair for digital economy 'NEXT Berlin 2013' in Berlin, Germany, 24 April 2013.  NEXT Berlin 2013 is an international trade for which serves as a platform of digital innovations from the worl

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google has been working for the past year to register the word “Glass” as a trademark in the United States. The company successfully received a trademark for the “Google Glass” name, but so far, has been unsuccessful to its attempts to trade the single word “Glass.”

According to the report, Google first submitted its application to trademark “Glass” with the classic, futuristic font last year. Shortly thereafter, Google heard back from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and was informed that the word could not be trademarked. One of the reasons cited by the office was that the trademark was too similar to other existing and pending computer software trademarks. This could lead to consumer confusion, according to the examiner.

The trademark examiner also claimed that the word “Glass”, even when written in its classic font, is “merely descriptive.” According to federal law, words that describe a product cannot be trademarked. “Google, like many businesses, takes routine steps to protect and register its trademarks,” a Google spokesman said.

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